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THE BOOKS ARE HERE!

Last Thursday Jenny drove down to Salem, OR to be with her Dad as he went in for cataract surgery. The surgery was successful. Jenny was able to be a calm, encouraging presence for her parents.

She was also able to make a trip to Your Town Press where I Remember Running Through the Woods was printed.

1,000 books all boxed up waited on a cart to be taken home.

pick up day 6

With the help of her sister, who brought her van to help haul books, Jenny was able to get them all loaded up!

pick up day 7

Wow! That’s a lot of books.

pick up day 5

And while they’re not perfect, we’re super happy with how they came out and with the story they tell!

We’re planning a big Release Party on Saturday, March 9th, at the opening of the Vintage Watercolor show at Sunnyshore Studio. There are a number of book signing events in the works, and we’re hoping to roll out a more official “release” on this site.

But if you’re interested in getting the book in advance of these events, it is for sale on our Store on this site.

Store

I want to thank everyone who encourages and supports local artists and authors. It is a joy to tell these stories of a boy growing up on an island in the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

Finally, it was a special joy to give the first gift to my son, Jacob, who helped me so much on this project. The book is, after all, dedicated to him:

“To Jacob, who loves the woods like I do.”

Sincerely, Jason Dorsey

Sunnyshore Studio announces our 2019 Artistic Season

Sunnyshore Studio is thrilled to announce our 2019 Artistic Season. We hope that you are able to visit us for one – or all! – of these shows as we “share beauty with the world.”

MARCH: VINTAGE WATERCOLORISTS OF WASHINGTON

Our season begins in March with the second of five Jack Dorsey Invitational: Vintage Watercolorists of Washington shows. We’re thrilled to partner again with the Northwest Watercolor Society (NWWS), one of the premier watercolor society’s in the US.

We’ll showcase the art and celebrate the lives and artistic legacies of five of Washington’s top watercolorists: Jerry Stitt, Seiko Konya, Nancy Fulton, Cooper Hart and Sandy Langford. Jack Dorsey will also have five of his paintings on display. And we are excited to have on display a watercolor by Elizabeth Warhanik, one of the founding members of Women Painters of Washington.

You won’t want to miss the meet the artist reception, 3-5pm, on March 9th. We expect it to be packed with watercolor lovers, artists and friends of the art as it was last year!

Check out the poster below for information on the show featuring one of Cooper Hart’s marine paintings.

Vintage Poster 2019 - Cooper

And here’s a video preview of the artists with some fun bloopers of Jack Dorsey and the making of the video.

MAY: CAMANO ISLAND STUDIO TOUR

Sunnyshore Studio will be participating in the popular “Studio Tour” hosted by the Camano Arts Association. The tour takes place over five days in May:

  • Friday, May 10, 10am-5pm
  • Saturday, May 11, 10am-5pm
  • Sunday, May 12, 10am-5pm
  • Saturday, May 18, 10am-5pm
  • Sunday, May 19, 10am-5pm

We will feature artwork by our family of artists: Fanny Y. Cory, Jack Dorsey, Ann Cory, Jason Dorsey, April Nelson, and Jed Dorsey, as well as guest artists who we’ll reveal at a later time.

Studio Tour Ad - 2019

The Studio Stour is a fun way to see beautiful Camano Island and experience the vibrant colony of artists there. Enjoy this virtual tour of some of our artists.

JACK DORSEY SILENT ART AUCTION

Jack Dorsey - Color

Jack Dorsey, the patriarch of our family of artists, is a well known northwest artist whose artworks are collected and prized. Jack has painted for close to sixty years and has an impressive body of art that ranges watercolor landscapes to still life and western oils. Here’s your chance to see a broad collection of Jack’s works, get your hands on a Jack Dorsey original, and maybe even a great deal on it too.

The silent auction will work this way. There will be a minimum bid for each painting. If you want to take the painting today there will be a price for that too. At the end of the show we will see what painting is going to a new home.

The show will take place over three Saturdays in June:

  • Saturday, June 15, 10am-5pm
  • Saturday, June 22, 10am-5pm
  • Saturday, June 29, 10am-5pm

OCTOBER: JED DORSEY SOLO SHOW

Jed Dorsey (1)

A highlight of our artistic season each year is Jed Dorsey’s solo show. Jed usually sells his shows out, and typically there are people waiting at the door to get in before the show opens!

Jed’s show will run on two Saturdays in October:

  • October 5th, 10am-5pm
  • October 12th, 10am-5pm

This year we’ll plan to host the show online as we did last October so Jed’s friends and fans across the US and world (remarkably, but it is true) can purchase his beautiful acrylic paintings.

If you want to learn more about Jed, or are interested in taking an online course in acrylics through his Acrylic University check out his web site:

www.jeddorseyart.com

DECEMBER CHRISTMAS SHOW

Each year we do a themed Christmas show. Last year’s show was “Christmas in Miniature”. We haven’t settled on a theme for our 2019 Christmas show. Maybe we’ll stick with the Christmas in miniature theme. Maybe we’ll branch out with something new.

But for sure we’ll have a wonderful time sharing new original art, and affordable prints, books we’ve published, and lots of delicious food and drinks. We’ll also have fun inviting guests artists who help us make this an especially festive show packed with friends!

Our family looks forward to welcoming you in to our creative studio-gallery as we share the beauty of Camano with the world!

IMG_7073

  • December 7th, 10am-5pm
  • December 14th, 10am-5pm

ART LIVES ON CAMANO!

10 ways to grow your creativity in 2019

The Bible says that you are made in the image of the Creator God, endowed with great capacity for creativity, and called to use your unique creative gifts to bring beauty, goodness and light into this broken, hurting and dark world. Here are ten practical ways to grow your creativity and share it with others in 2019. I’ll start at #10 and work down to #1, easiest to hardest.

10. Take time each day to enjoy the beauty of God’s creation. 

This can be as simple as stopping to breathe the fresh air after a rain or to look at the raindrops glisten on the branches of a bush at your front door. It is about being aware of and thankful for the beauty and gift of creation, in all its manifold glory. It includes going for walks, but also reading a good book, hearing a loved song, enjoying a fine painting.  It will probably include putting your phone away, and being present in the place where you are. The point is, you have to stop what you are doing, and take time to enjoy the beauty. As the German writer Goethe put it:

“Every day one should at least hear one little song, read one good poem, see one fine painting and — if at all possible — speak a few sensible words.” Goethe 

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9. Make flower arrangements and other pretty things to bring beauty into your home, workplace.

Growing up in a family of artists we were very poor. But my mother brought beauty into the home by making flower arrangements, and displays of pretty things. Even though for the first 12 or so years of my life, we used sheets/blankets for many of the inside doors of our home, it was, nonetheless a place of beauty. Don’t let the grind of life, the gloom of poverty, the sense of being powerless crush your heart and cripple your love for beauty. You are in charge. You can do something. That something might be to go outside, cut some flowers and branches, and make an arrangement as your revolt against the mundane routine and victim posture.

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8. Set creative goals.

As the saying goes, if we aim at nothing we’ll hit it every time. So take time at the start of this new year to think about your creative gifts. They might be gifts of problem-solving, or woodworking, or landscaping, or writing poetry, or story-telling, or composing music, or creativity in leadership. There are countless ways that you can be creative. Once you have determined how you are uniquely wired as a creative person, make some goals for how you want to encourage your creativity in this new year. Don’t let the tyranny of the urgent, your shame at the thought of failure, your lack of time, etc. keep you from taking steps, even if they are only baby steps, in creativity. This year, I’m hoping to complete one of the largest creative projects of my life: a documentary movie that has taken almost 5 years to make. But it started with my going out an buying a video camera. Make a goal. Start somewhere.

7. Coordinate a poetry reading night.

One of the great gifts my mom gave to us kids was reading poetry. She had inherited her love of reading poems from her mother, Sayre, who had a beloved book of poems called 101 Famous Poems. Mom read them to us and encouraged us to memorize them. Still today I can recite many of these beloved poems. Poetry is becoming a lost art, but the crafting of words into potent phrases bursts open doors of meaning and unlocks the emotions of the heart. Some of my friends, Ed Nudelman and Anne Doe Overstreet, are modern day poets and their books are worth turning to. So too are the poets of olden days. For religious poets, John Donne, George Herbert and John Milton can’t be beat. I also love the Romantic poets: Woordsworth, Keats and Cooleridge. Shakespeare is wonderful too. I quoted two Shakespeare poems to Jenny the night I asked her to marry me. One fun way to build community is to host a poetry reading night with your family, or widened to include friends and neighbors. Light your fire (if you have one) or some candles, open a bottle of wine, circle up the chairs, and read, laugh and cry as your hearts come alive and share in beauty together.

Sayre Dodgson, Jason Dorsey, Ann Dorsey

6. Make little creative gifts that are “you” and share them with others.

In the olden days, when money was short, people made a lot more gifts. We spend way more money, but I wonder if our gifts are nearly as meaningful as they once were. A way to put your creative self out there (see #2) without too much risk is to give away gifts that you have made. After all, who is going to be mean and reject a gift. Again, there are so many different kinds of gifts you can give that tap into your creativity. You may be creative as a trip planner. So give away to someone your “trip planning” creativity by gifting them by planning an upcoming trip with them, bringing into it your special creativity in how to enjoy and engage in a new place. You could make a flower arrangement and give it as a birthday gift, or make a card with a little painting and poem. My great-grandmother, Fanny Y. Cory made the card below that went with a gift of towels: it was kept by our family, while so many other store bought cards have been thrown away. Your creativity will be valued by others!

5. Take an art class.

One of the very best ways to grow as a creative person is to take an art class, or poetry class, etc. To grow you have to be teachable, and to put yourself under a Master from whom you want to learn. Along these lines, I’m super excited that my brother Jed Dorsey is starting Acrylic University which will make his gifts of teaching, nurture, encouragement more accessible to people all over the world via the web. I’ve personally benefited from many art classes in the past, and feel like I’m ready to give back a little myself. I’m talking with old friends from Seattle about tutoring their middle school aged daughter in art, and with Ben Franklin down the road, about teaching an art class or two. My friend Karla Matzke on Camano Island always has wonderful art classes going on at her place. Check out her Matzke Gallery. Plan this year to take an art workshop or class this year (or two or three), until you find the thing that fits well with who you are and that you enjoy doing.

4. Join an artistic club or community or cohort. Or start your own.

To grow as a creative person, you have to put yourself into creative community with other creatives. You’ll be inspired by your friends, challenged to grow as a creative person, and encouraged along the way. I’m currently a member of the Northwest Watercolor Society and President of the Camano Arts Association. If you want to get really serious about your creativity, you’ll probably have to go smaller and find a few creative friends with who you will really open up your heart, your creative work, to. A great example of the cultural impact of this kind of fellowship is the Inklings, which was a group of friends who met in C.S. Lewis’ rooms in Oxford University, England to talk, smoke, drink and read their latest writings. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and Dorothy Sayers were all members of this illustrious group of friends, and the quantity and quality of their culture-shaping, creative work is impressive. But don’t let this intimidate you. Why not do something more simple and humble, like my great grandmother, Fanny Y. Cory did. She started for her grandchildren the “grunt and groan art club”. They met weekly at her home to paint.

Meetsy's pictures I own, Robert scanned 007.jpg

You can read more about that here. https://sunnyshorestudio.com/tag/grunt-and-groan-art-club/

3. Work on a creative project.

This one is kind of obvious. But that’s ok. Start a creative project in 2019. Again, the scope of this can be really broad. You may redesign the landscaping of your home, or repaint and redecorate your home to make it more hospitable, or more a still and sacred space, or… You may decide that you are going to take up photography, and chronicle your year with one creative photograph each day. You may decide to finally write that children’s book, or that novel that you have always dreamed of. One of my creative dreams is to write a series of 12 children picture books, which I expect will take me over a decade and be finished when I am in my 60’s. Have a dream and act on it!

I Remember Collection

2. Share your creative work with others.

Putting your creative work out there, sharing it with others, is SOOOO hard. Why? Because it is so personal. It feels like we are putting ourselves out there, and opening ourselves up to rejection and criticism.  And we are, in a way. Even though our creative work is not “us”, in a unique way we do identify with it. So it hurts when people are critical of it. But the only way that we can grow as creative people is to be willing to let our creative work be seen and to be open to critique, even rejection. But we are also opening ourselves up to encouragement and support to. You can’t have one without the other. Growing up, I had both critique and encouragement with my creativity. My dad was my biggest critic and would absolutely rip apart my artworks, telling me where it was bad, where I had screwed up. My mom, on the other hand, was my biggest supporter and encouragement. Between the two of them I had precisely what I needed. When I was 23 years old I was painting watercolors pretty seriously, I started entering them into national and international shows. I was rejected by many of those shows, but accepted into many too (it was about 50/50), and even won some prizes. If you don’t put your creative work out there, you won’t grow as a creator. You need both critique and encouragement from others.

History - Stanwood Camano Fair

1. Accept that you are hand-crafted by the Creator God with great creative capacities and a creative calling.

I chose this as the first, and hardest, step in the creative journey because it requires faith. Being creative, building creative community, and putting your creative self out there is hard. We are all, to some degree, insecure. But if you accept that you are hand crafted by the Personal Creator God, that this God God endowed you with unique creative gifts and calls you to share them with others, you will be empowered to take big steps, or baby steps as a creative person.

Come on, together with me, daring to be the creative people God has designed us to be for the glory of God and the good of the world! Your never to young, or to old, to start.

History - Jason painting

Sincerely, Jason Dorsey

Our Year in Review: A hearty thanks to our friends, patrons and backers in 2018!

As we look back at 2018, our family has so very much to be thankful for. We are especially grateful for the many friends, patrons and backers who have visited our Camano “bricks and mortar” studio, who have purchased art on-line, and who have backed our creative projects.

Thank you so much! You have helped us carry out our mission to share beauty with the world.

Here are some highlights from 2018.

March: Vintage Watercolorists of Washington show

We hosted the first of five Jack Dorsey Invitational: Vintage Watercolorists of Washington art show to celebrate the life and legacy of some of Washington’s top watercolor artists.

Vintage flier front

The Vintage show was a great success. A number of newspaper articles were written about it, the artwork was spectacular and a large crowd attended the opening. We are especially thankful for the NWWS partnering with us on the show.

April: Jed, Renae & Willow move back to Washington

Certainly a highlight for the Dorsey clan was to have Jed, Renae and Willow move back from their much loved home in Indianapolis to the northwest. Jed is a gifted artist. He, Renae and Willow make a terrific team and their presence is a joy to all of us.

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May: Mother’s Day Studio Tour

We participated in the popular Camano Island Mother’s Day Studio tour over Mother’s Day weekend and the following “encore” weekend. This is always a fun time to see old friends and make news one, and sell a lot of art, books, cards, and posters. We enjoyed very much the guest artists that joined us for the show. And we are so thankful for the many friends and supporters who “shop local” and support the artist colony on Camano.

 

July: Enjoying and Sharing Camano

A highlight each year is July on Camano with its long, warm days. Sunnyshore Studio’s artistic director take a month vacation from his work as a Presbyterian pastor in Redmond, WA. These are wonderful days of playing with friends, enjoying Camano’s beaches, enjoying long stretches of time for creativity, and working on projects around the studio. One highlight from this summer was a BIG WORK PARTY we organized at Jack and Ann Dorsey’s home!

 

August: Work begins on Jack Dorsey’s Tiny House

We began Jackie’s Tiny House this summer. The project is coming together nicely. We expect it to be all ready for the 2019 Mother’s Day Studio Tour. Jenny Dorsey was the mastermind of this project. She had lots of help from Jacob, Jackie, Jason and Grandpa Jack!

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October: Jed Dorsey’s “Home” Show

Jed’s art show in October was a smashing success. Titled “Home”, it explored the places of the heart, and how art can capture that longing for and sense of home we have. We’re super thankful for Jed’s friend Russ Baumgarner and his painting company Rubumco for sponsoring the show. We held our first “on line” opening, and sold many paintings over the web. We’re excited about the potential of being able to share beauty with people who are not able to visit our “bricks and mortar” gallery. And we’re thankful for all of Jed’s fans, friends and patrons who support his work by buying his art.

Home Poster (1)

November: I Remember Running Through the Woods

In November we turned in the manuscript of Jason Dorsey’s I Remember Running Through the Woods to the printer. We are super excited to be publishing the second book in this ten book series. The book will be released in January, 2019.

Cover - I RTW

 

November: Successful Kickstarter Campaign for “We are Family” documentary

In November we launched a 30 day Kickstarter campaign with the goal of raising 25K to complete a documentary about an inner city basketball team from Indianapolis who against all odds won the state championship. The movie is titled We are Family. Just hours before the closing of the social funding campaign we reached our goal of 25K! We’re so thankful for the 110+ backers who believed enough in us and this project to give so generously. We expect to show the movie for the first time in March 2019.

 

December: Christmas in Miniature Show

We culminated the year with our annual Christmas show.

Christmas Poster 2018

This year’s show had the theme of “miniatures” and it featured small paintings, the unveiling of Jack Dorsey’s annual Christmas card, the soft opening of Jackie’s tiny house, and wonderful miniature displays set up by Jenny. It was super fun to have a number of guest artists showcased this year!

We had a terrific lineup of local artists. It was great to be able to share their wonderful art!

And again, we are thankful for the many friends and patrons who stopped by, who purchased art and cards, etc.

 

Conclusion

In 2018, Sunnyshore Studio had a strong year. This included showcasing original art, publishing books and working on a documentary. We are passionate about our calling to share beauty with the world through these different mediums. And we are passionate about building community through art. We are so thankful for the many friends, collectors, patrons and backers who have stood with us this year!

JENNY  AND I AND OUR ENTIRE FAMILY ARE THANKFUL FOR YOU ALL!

Dorsey shares plan for twelve book “I Remember” series

Jason Dorsey’s new children’s picture book, I Remember Running Through The Woods, is coming out in January. At Sunnyshore Studio’s “Christmas in Miniature Show” a poster displayed Jason’s projected books in this 12 book series.

We caught up to Jason this week. Here is our interview with the author/illustrator of the ambitious I Remember children’s book series.

Sunnyshore Studio: When did you first dream of the I Remember children’s picture book series?

Jason:  Our family moved to Indianapolis, IN in 2002. In 2003, I must have been missing my dad and the fishing waters of the Puget Sound, so I began to sketch a draft of what became I Remember Fishing with Dad. Being who I am, it was not long after those early sketches that I conceived of a twelve book series with each book starting with I Remember.

Sunnyshore Studio: I Remember Fishing with Dad wasn’t published until October of 2015. Why did it take so long from conception to publication?

Jason: Mainly because I had no idea what I was doing. I had never written a children’s picture book before so I had a lot to learn about storytelling and illustration. I went to children’s book conferences, hired children’s book coaches, and submitted the manuscript again and again. In fact, by around 2013 I had given up. I still view it as a minor miracle that an old friend named Shelley Huston, who ran a small publishing company, reconnected with me and published the book. I tell this story in my post “A Tale of Many Rejections.” 

IRFD Cover

Sunnyshore Studio: What is your vision for this series? 

Jason: I want to tell stories that both delight and instruct. I want children and adults to enjoy the stories and the artwork that goes with each story. But they are more than just a collection of stories about a boy growing up on an island. Each story explores a universal theme, and, I hope, provides some insight to it. I Remember Fishing with Dad explores the significance of the father-son relationship. I Remember Running through the Woods, uses the ever-changing woods to talk about how to deal with change.

Sunnyshore Studio: Why do you start each book with “I Remember”?

Jason: Because I want to emphasize how very important the memories of childhood are and because I want to encourage the making of “sacred memories.” In our childhood time moves slow and the memories we make go deep into who we are, shaping us, and even, as the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky puts it in The Brothers Karamazov, the “instrument of our salvation one day.”

 “Let us never forget how happy we were here, when we were all together, united by such a good and kind feeling…My dear children, perhaps you will not understand what I’m going to say to you now, for I often speak very incomprehensibly, but, I’m sure, you will remember that there’s nothing higher, stronger, more wholesome and more useful in life than some good memory, especially when it goes back to the days of your childhood, to the days of your life at home. You are told a lot about your education, but some beautiful, sacred memory, preserved since, is perhaps the best education of all. If a man carries many such memories into life with him, he is saved for the rest of his days. And even if only one good memory is left in our hearts, it may be the instrument of our salvation one day.”

These lines have been an inspiration for this series from the beginning.

Sacred Memories

Sunnyshore Studio: These stories are about a boy growing up on an island. Camano Islanders will recognize the island as there own. Why did you choose to base the stories on Camano?

Road to the State Park

Jason: I believe place matters. Since most of my “sacred memories” took place on Camano, I’m basing the stories in my place (though I never mention the name of Camano). The story lines are built on memories that other northwesterners share: like salmon fishing, playing in the woods, bringing in the hay, picking wild blackberries. In fact, a few weeks ago at the “Christmas in Miniature” show, I had a long conversation with a couple who grew up blackberry picking like I did. It is amazing at how similar our experiences were. The same can be said of fishing, and so on. Yet, even though the story is based in the northwest, the themes are universal and, I hope, accessible to everyone.

Plus I like maps in stories. So this gives me a chance to put maps in each of my stories.

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I hope by celebrating a specific place, I can encourage people to value the places in their lives too!

Sunnyshore Studio: One of the special aspects of this series is that your dad partnered with you to illustrate the first two books. Why did you choose to do this?

Jason: For the first book, I Remember Fishing with Dad, I thought it would be cool to have my dad illustrate the book with me since it is about the father-son relationship and since he lived the story with me. Plus, I really wanted, and needed his help to make great illustrations. In 2006 we spent a week painting what would be the first round of illustrations for the book. We had to redo many of these in 2015. So it was quite a process.

Remember 6.jpg

I tried to illustrate I Remember Running Through the Woods by myself. But I was running out of time, and I asked Dad to help again. He graciously agreed, and really helped to bring the book to life artistically. Here are a few examples of his great work.

Sunnyshore Studio:  These aren’t your normal children’s book illustrations that are more, how should I say it, child level art. These are more serious watercolors.

Jason: Part of my vision was to use high quality, serious watercolors for the illustrations. I hope to inspire a few youngsters to perhaps take up the paintbrush themselves.

Cover - I RTW

Sunnyshore Studio: I Remember Fishing with Dad was published by Just Dust Publishers. Why did you choose to have Sunnyshore Studio by the publisher for I Remember Running Through The Woods?

Jason: A couple of reasons. First, Just Dust Publishers closed there doors. Second, by publishing through Sunnyshore Studio we cut out the middle man and keep our costs down. Sunnyshore Studio has published a number of books over the past three years, and has “cracked the code” so to speak of the editing, graphic design and layout of publishing. So we decided to keep it in house.

Sunnyshore Studio: Since your first sketches (2003) to today (2018), you’ve only published two books. What makes you think you can publish 10 more? And which book is next?

Jason: Well, like I said, we’ve “cracked the code” by publishing the books in-house. This allows us a little more freedom and flexibility. Hopefully we can get on a roll and publish a book a year. That’s the dream at least. And I like “big dreams”, they inspire me. I’m not afraid to fail.

I’m not sure what book will be next. I’m currently writing I Remember Haying at the Farm. This book will explore the importance of hard work, of family members/families working together as a team, and or working on their relationships with each other. The work of keeping up a farm, specifically of the annual summer bringing in the hay ritual, is the context to explore this theme. I have great memories of haying with my cousins.

Sunnyshore Studio: When is I Remember Running Through the Woods going to be released?

Jason: You should know that, since you’re the publisher of the book! The printer tells me that it will be ready to be picked up by mid/late January. If people are interested they can pre-order their copy here:

Store

On-line sale (25% off) of original Illustrations of I Remember Running Through the Woods

Here’s your chance to purchase an original illustration from I Remember Running through the Woods painted by father-son duo, Jack and Jason Dorsey. From December 1st – December 8th these paintings are offered at a 25% sale with a signed copy of the book thrown in. Shipping and handling – if necessary – is not included in the price below. Also, with some of the paintings you have the choice between purchasing them framed or unframed.

What a better way to share the beauty of reading and art with your child, grandchild or someone you love.

If you are interested in one of these paintings please call or text Jason Dorsey: 317.209.6768

Loggers on Camano

Loggers felled the Old Growth

  • By Jason Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • Unframed $300
  • Framed $400

 

Logs in harbor

Ships with tall masts

  • By Jason Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • SOLD

 

Book 4

An Island in the Northwest

  • By Jason Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • PRIVATE COLLECTION

 

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An Old Logging Road Led Through the Woods

  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • Jason Dorsey
  • SOLD

 

Kids walking to farm in daytime

Sunlight danced through the trees

  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • Jason Dorsey and Jack Dorsey
  • SOLD

 

Kids running home at night

Stumps became scary monsters

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • SOLD

 

coming home

Warm lights of home

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • Jason Dorsey and Jack Dorsey
  • SOLD

 

exploring swamp

In the Spring he explored the swamp

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • $225 Unframed
  • $325 Framed

 

Huckleberry, blackberry patch picking

In the Summer they picked Huckleberries

  • By Jack and Jason Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • Jason Dorsey and Jack Dorsey
  • SOLD

 

Splitting Winter Wood - Final

In the Fall they split wood

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 16.5” by 30”
  • Jason Dorsey and Jack Dorsey
  • SOLD

 

Boy, Woods, Snow

In the Winter the woods still

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • $300 unframed
  • $400 framed

 

5. Military Gear

Military Gear

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • $225 Unframed

 

1. Dad's Bayonet

Dad’s Bayonet

  • By Jason and Jacqueline Dorsey
  • Pencil and Watercolor
  • 8.5” by 11”
  • $150 Unframed

 

2. Dad's Bayonet Sheath

Dad’s Bayonet Sheath

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 8.5” by 11”
  • $225 Unframed

 

Tom and Jason heading into woods for camp out - final

It was getting dark when they headed out to the woods

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • SOLD

 

The Campsight - Final

They ate the chili and pineapple

  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 15”
  • Jason Dorsey and Jack Dorsey
  • $225 Unframed
  • $325 Framed

 

Treetop View of Tent - Final

They went to bed

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 15”
  • SOLD

 

8. Eyes stared at them

Eyes stared at them

  • By Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 11.5” by 15”
  • Jack Dorsey
  • $225 Unframed
  • $400 Framed

 

9. It's your uncle's cows.jpg

It’s your Uncle’s Cows

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • $225 Unframed
  • $325 Framed

 

 

Over the Fence - Final

They Jumped Over the Fence

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 17”
  • SOLD

 

3. One Match Left

One Match Left

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Pencil and Watercolor
  • 7.5” by 11”
  • $75 Unframed

 

 

Fire - FINAL 

He struck the Match

  • Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 16”
  • $300 Unframed
  • $400 Framed

 

Big Bonfire - Final

The fire blazed high and hot

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 15”
  • $300 Unframed
  • $400 Framed

 

Morning at Farm - Final

Morning has finally Come, Book Cover Image

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 16.5” by 30.5”
  • SOLD

 

4. Off to College

Off to College

  • By Jack and Jason Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • Jason Dorsey and Jack Dorsey
  • $225 Unframed
  • $325 Framed

 

 

Clear Cut Final

The Woods were logged

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • $300 Unframed
  • $400 Framed

 

Jason Crying - Final 

He Cried because nothing stays the same forever

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • $225 Unframed
  • $325 Framed

 

Version 2

Woodshed

  • By Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 11.5” by 18”
  • Painted in 1970. Dad used this as a painting to show Mrs. Greathouse, the owner and director of the Frye Art Museum, Seattle, WA. She was impressed enough with that and a few other paintings to grant dad a one man art show at the Frye in 1972.
  • $700 Unframed
  • $850 Framed

 

6. The Woods were as magic as ever

The Woods were as Magic as Ever

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • SOLD

 

Stump - final - use this one

Stump and Sapling

  • By Jason and Jack Dorsey
  • Watercolor
  • 15” by 22”
  • $300 Unframed
  • $400 Framed

 

These original illustrations will be showcased at the “Christmas in Miniature” show at Sunnyshore Studio on Saturday, December 1st and 8th.

  • 10am-5pm
  • 2803 SE Camano Drive, Camano Island, WA

Pre-order “I Remember Running Through the Woods” children’s book

You can pre-order Jason Dorsey’s new children’s book I Remember Running Through the Woods here:

Store

Start your collection of all twelve of the I Remember series by adding to that order the first in the series, I Remember Fishing with Dad. 

IRFD Cover

All 29 of the original illustrations painted by Jason and Jack Dorsey will be on display at the Christmas in miniature show that opens at on Saturday, December 1st (10am-5pm) and for a second Saturday, December 8th (10am-5pm).

Christmas Poster 2018

Kickstarter Campaign: 20 Day Report and Wrapping up Interviews

Kickstarter

We are twenty days into the thirty day Kickstarter campaign.  We are blown away that over 16K has been pledged by 58 backers. We are 64% of the way towards reaching our 25K goal. But we still have a long way to go and an uphill climb.

It has been so encouraging and so humbling to see who has stood with us in this project by making a pledge. My family has rallied. Many of my friends in Indy – both my old church and IPS families –  have stepped up to help too, which makes my heart sing. And then there are the people I don’t know who have eagerly supported the project. Their trust and support is humbling.

We have had one MAJOR gift of 5K. There have been five PRODUCER level gifts of $1,000 (or more). And then lots of smaller gifts ranging from $1 – $400. Popular pledge sizes are $40 and $100. The reward for a $100 pledge is the digital “uncut” version of the movie, where we will be able to share much more of the footage than we will for the final version of the movie.

The way Kickstarter works is “all or nothing.” If we hit our goal of raising 25K, we will receive the money that has been pledged. If we do not hit our goal, we won’t receive any money at all. The last day of our Kickstarter campaign in December 1st. We still have $9,000 to raise. So we are in the last push.

If you would like to support the project go to this link:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/jasondorsey/we-are-family-0?ref=user_menu

Wrapping up interviews in Indianapolis

Last week we wrapped up interviews in Indianapolis.  Director Jason Dorsey spent 2.5 days in Indy working with his video production crew, David Lichty and Tremayne Reed, to film the interviews.

November Trip 3

They also got some good B-roll footage.

The interviews were absolutely amazing!

Here is the interview lineup:

Tuesday, November 13 

  • Shaun Richardson, Player on the Tech championship team
  • Victor Bush, Tech/IPS Athletic Director (during the State Championship season)
  • Dr. Michael Brown, IPS Board Member (during the State Championship season)
  • Michael Woodson, Tech alumni, grandfather of Tech players Jerome Campbell and Jeremie Tyler
  • Mikey Jones, Tech basketball Player
  • Leo Williams, Tech basketball player
  • Terry Loux, Tech Alumni. He scouted 16 games for the State Champion Tech Titan team.

 

Wednesday, November 14

  • In the morning we filmed around the Tech neighborhood and at Arsenal Tech HS.
  • Then we drove up to Lebanon and interviewed John Sexson, brother of Joe Sexson who played for the 1952 Tech team who made it to the state championship game and lost to Muncie Central.
  • Donte Gladney Jr, Tech basketball player; and we got Mike Jones for a second round of interviews.

 

Thursday, November 15

  • Jamie Wolf, who was the athletic trainer during the Championship season.
  • Jeremie Tyler, Tech basketball player.
  • Devon Mickens, Tech basketball player.

 

All of the interviews were amazing and it is impossible to single any of them out. But Thursday’s interviews were special, and pretty much nailed out story down. The biggest challenge the video production team now faces is what to cut!

During a break on Thursday Jason asked David to give a plug for the movie and the Kickstarter campaign. Check it out.

One last thing. Early on Wednesday morning Jason was able to enjoy breakfast and catching up with three old friends from Indianapolis: Kipp N., Paul B. and Matt A. at Peppy’s.

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It was a whirlwind couple of days, but worth it in terms of the amazing footage we got.

We are family

            For all the urban schools that struggle with bad press

            For all the urban youth that are told you can’t do this

            For all the urban teachers and administrators whose stories are never told

            For Tech High School

            For Indianapolis Public Schools

 

 

Lineup of artists for “Christmas in Miniature” show

We have a wonderful lineup of artists for our Christmas in Miniature show that opens on Saturday, December 1st, 10am-5pm. You won’t want to miss our “meet the artist” reception from 3:00-5:00 on the 1st. You’ll recognize some “big name” artists in the northwest as well as some emerging artists.

Each artist was told that they must keep their paintings to no more than 12” by 16”, or 160 square inches. You’ll be delighted to view their original small and affordable paintings.

Here’s the lineup:

Lydia Crouch

Lydia

Lydia Crouch is most often referred to as “the one who paints the dresses,” as her heart toward the emotional recovery of human trafficking victims is a passion that comes through in her work.  She also loves painting simple moments from her world at home on Camano Island.  She is married to Rich Crouch and has two grown children.  She more than grateful to be adopted into Dorsey Studios where she paints live on Thursdays at the Gallery in Camano Commons.

Ann Cory 

Ann Cory

Ann Cory is the granddaughter of nationally famous illustrator/cartoonist/artist Fanny Y. Cory. She is the wife of Northwest artist, Jack Dorsey, and the mother of artists Jason Dorsey, April Nelson, and Jed Dorsey.  She has been a on again, off again artist throughout her adult life during her life seasons.  Now, after a bout with cancer in 2015, she is on again and enjoying it very much.

 

Marilyn Crandall

Marilyn

As a plein-air watercolorist, Marilyn Crandall‘s free and loose strokes uniquely capture landscape images and country scenes with an emphasis on strong patterns of light and dark.

This artist grew up in several western states as her engineer dad worked on the large hydroelectric dam projects from Arizona to Oregon, California to Washington, Utah to Montana.   She graduated with honors from Parsons, The New School for Design in New York City where she majored in Environmental Design.  Prior to that she attended the University of Washington, College of Architecture, where she was introduced to watercoloring as a way to render her designs.   Her profession has been as a registered architect; her passion is watercolor.

She feels privileged to have taken workshops with Eric Weigardt, Tony Van Hasselt, Kathy Collins, and Diane Hill, among others. All have been mentors. She is a member of the Washington Watercolor Society, the Roaming Artists, and CAA, Camano Arts Association.

She has painted abroad in Guatemala, China, Korea and Mexico as well as in the USA in Maine, Virginia, Georgia, Washington DC and now can paint the coastal scenes and rural landscapes of Washington State, particularly the amazing Salish Sea area.

Betty Dorotik

Betty Dorotik

“My love of birds greatly influences my works either on canvas, paper, or wood. Nature is my resource and is abundant outside my window or door, always pausing me to watch and observe and apply. “ bettydorotik.com

 

Jack Dorsey

Jack Dorsey - Color

Jack Dorsey is a lifelong resident of Washington State and is a graduate of Seattle Pacific College.  He has to his credit two one-man shows at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle and a one-man show in Tokyo, Japan.  Jack Dorsey’s art has been collected by the Frye Art Museum and the LaConner Historical Museum along with numerous corporations and private collectors throughout the U.S.A. and internationally.

Jack Dorsey  is a former president of the Northwest Watercolor Society and a past member of the Puget Sound Group of Painters.  Currently he is a life member of the Northwest Watercolor Society and an associate member of Oil Painters of North America.

Jack Dorsey’s emergence back into the art world came in 1997 after retirement from the Boeing Company after sixteen years as a production illustrator in Everett.  In the past few years collectors started to find Jack Dorsey’s fine art during the annual Mother’s Day Studio Tour on Camano Island where he makes his home.  Jack Dorsey is known for his watercolors which can be described as impressionistic realism.

It is interesting to note that all of Jack’s family are artists also.  His wife, Ann Cory paints in acrylics; the youngest son, Jed Dorsey paints in acrylics and oils; while April and Jason Dorsey have achieved painting success also.

As a long established Northwest artist, Jack Dorsey cordially invites inquiries and visits to his home if anyone is interested in collecting his fine art.

 

Jacqueline Dorsey

Jackie Dorsey

Jacqueline was born in Seattle, Washington in March of 2002. She grew up in Indiana and loved exploring the beauty of the Midwest and the Northwest as a child.

Jackie always enjoyed doing and watching family members do art. She decided she wanted to learn how to do watercolor and joined the Dorsey Art Show at The Harrison Gallery in Indianapolis. She sold her first painting, and soon after that, was asked to do her first commission. Jackie has been painting and learning ever since, showcasing a few paintings at the Mother’s day shows here on Camano each year.

She is currently taking a watercolor class as a Running Start Student at Bellevue College. Along with her family, she has been working on creating an extension of the Sunnyshore Studio by building a tiny house. The tiny house will serve as a place to create, showcase her art as well as others, will serve as her own place to spend time with the people she loves, and as a place to share the beauty of Camano with the world. Jackie is also partnering with her dad, Jason Dorsey, on a two year project, Discover Beautiful Camano Island, to aid in the creation of a book, documentary, and art show.

 

Jason Dorsey

DSC_4735 (2)

Jason Dorsey a pastor of Redeemer, a Presbyterian church in Redmond, WA. On the side, he is the Artistic Director of Sunnyshore Studio, serves as president of the Camano Arts Association, and chairs the Stanwood-Camano Arts Advocacy Commission. Jason grew up in a family of artists and enjoys teaming up with them now in the “family business”. As a watercolor artist, Jason enjoys integrating watercolor and writing in books.

Jed Dorsey

Jed Dorsey (1)

Award winning artist Jed Dorsey is known for his radiant acrylic landscapes. He uses bold colors and strong design to portray his vision of the world. His work has been featured on the HGTV show Good Bones, included in museum collections, and can be found in homes and businesses throughout the U.S. and Canada.  Jed grew up on Camano Island and is happy to be living in the area after many years away. You can find him painting and teaching at Dorsey Fine Art Studio located at Camano Commons on the island. www.jeddorseyart.com

John Ebner

best J. Ebner - Feb 2018 (6)

John Ebner began a unique, life long journey of discovery while growing up on his family’s farm in Sublimity, Oregon. His enthusiasm for life and never ending curiosity were energized through freedom on the farm and the adventures with three brothers, one sister and loving parents. Little did he realize that one day he would give artistic expression to all he was discovering and more.

In the seventh grade, John submitted a collection of his drawings of birds and flowers to his grade school teacher and was surprised his work received so much praise. He continued drawing and painting and eventually enrolled in art school. As an adult and needing to earn a living. John was engaged as a manufacturer’s representative, covering the Northwest and continued to explore painting in his spare time.

With his love of art and his creative spirit, John’s path of discovery took an interesting turn. What once was a hobby turned into a passionate dedication and his talent flourished. Continuing to support his family he began developing his artistic skills, produced an assortment of paintings and delivered them to a local gallery. To his surprise, the gallery contacted him a short time later saying all paintings have been sold and requested he create more. Further sales and requests brought John the realization he just might be able to support his family by painting full time and presented the idea to Paula. She wholeheartedly agreed and from that point forward he devoted his life entirely to his art.

The next step in John’s journey of discovery answered that question and served as a critical turn in the road. From the beginning of their marriage, John’s wife Paula, had served as his main source of encouragement and inspiration. Perhaps sensing that John was ready for a major change, she signed his up for a watercolor course, leading to his dramatic transformation.

Over the next few years John’s popularity grew, the demand for his paintings increased and he is now considered on of the Pacific Northwest’s most admired and collected artists.

Many of the captivating qualities of John’s work are apparent. His life-long love of the Pacific Northwest is revealed through the countless compelling vistas he has captured. His curiosity always drawing him to the next step, newest technique and desire to see beyond the obvious. Although reluctant to define his own work, preferring that it speak for itself, he admits that the magic of water has served as an element continually engaging his imagination. He frequently returns to explore the serenity and essence of waterfalls, rivers, seascapes, and beaches that invite him to look beyond the mist. His unique and recognizable motif of rain People huddled under umbrellas, strolling on an ocean beach or lingering on a city street add a timeless and etherial dimension to his work.

John’s artistic journey continues as he experiments and explores new forms, subjects and techniques. He is forever grateful for the many emotional rewards his art provides him as well as the gratification and joy voiced by others who see or own his work. Ever humble, ever curious, John is still looking to discover what lies on the other side of the mountain or beyond the mist.

John is a past president of the Northwest Watercolor Society and a life member of the Puget sound group of Northwest Artists.

Laurie Laun

Laurie 2

Born in Michigan in 1946, Laurie has practiced art throughout her life, including early study at the Chicago Art Institute.  While raising her family and earning several college degrees including an MBA, she served for many years as an executive in high tech companies.  In her travels to over 30 countries Laurie has become informed by many artistic cultures: she mastered batik in Java, aboriginal dot painting in Australia,

mulberry paper-making in Fiji, wood engraving and block printing in Singapore and haiku poetry in Japan.  She lives on beautiful Camano Island.

Amy Martin

Amy Martin

Amy Martin is a graduate of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania with a BA in Creative Writing and a minor in Painting.  Her eclectic oil and acrylic paintings are inspired by the beauty all around her­­–the color of coffee in a cup, a blooming poppy, the angular white of a ski slope, or an airplane swooping to land on a river.  Amy’s former professions include Army Blackhawk helicopter pilot and Boeing Change Specialist which fuel her passion for aviation and birds-eye-view paintings. Currently, she lives and works from her home studio on Camano Island in Washington where she shows annually in the juried Camano Arts Association Studio Tour. She is enrolled in Goddard College’s MFA Creative Writing Program and is working on a book length flight memoir.  She can be found on FB @juniperbeachstudio and Instagram at Amy_martin_artist.

April Nelson

April Nelson

April enjoys sharing the natural beauty of the world through art. Whether she is capturing the rich colors of dusk on a slough in the Skagit Valley or the thundering rise of a flock of snow geese, creating art is about seeing and thinking together. She appreciates the beautiful world that God created and she hopes that her art will communicate this to the viewer.

 

John Ringen

John Ringen

John was President of NWWS in 1964–1965, and has fifty years of impressive credentials; teaching numerous classes and workshops at college and adult levels, commercial illustrating, and judging a variety of festivals, exhibitions and open shows primarily throughout the Northwest. He has an enviable list of exhibition awards.

John and his wife of 43 years, Vicky, spend half their time each year in their motor home traveling to Yellowstone, the Tetons, and up and down the coast, visiting some of the finer wineries (he has quite a fine collection of wine). When home, he paints every day; at least 4 hours or more in his fantastic studio/gallery which is separate from his house. That way he “doesn’t have to clean up all the time.”

John attended the University of Washington on an athletic scholarship though he “wasn’t much for athletics.” After marrying Vicky, he joined Boeing when children came into their world. His strong inspiration to pursue art was fueled by two things: the only thing he ever got an A on in school was art, and his uncle, a commercial artist, always supplied him with whatever art materials he needed.

John works on up to fourteen paintings at once. He loves to paint anything that has to do with Northwest scenery and landscapes. His loose, impressionistic painting style has earned him frequent accolades and awards.

Regarding himself as an artist who records his visual impressions and feelings, he is a “reaction painter.” John enthusiastically proclaims that there is nothing quite as exciting, challenging and rewarding as attacking a crisp white sheet of watercolor paper.

Melanie Serroels

Melanie Serroels

Melanie started in watercolor during the last year of High School. She took workshops with collected Pacific Northwest Artist Charles Mulvey during college, and then when time permitted then took workshops with Robert Landry. Jack Dorsey & Thomas William Jones, Dianna Shyne and also Jed Dorsey. Melanie paints with both watercolors and acrylics.  She is a member of the NW Watercolor Society.  Since the first arriving on Camano Island in 2004 she has been a member of two local art groups, Camano Arts Association and the Stanwood Camano Art Guild. Currently, she volunteers several hours per week for the Camano Arts Association doing administrative work for CAA’s 80+ Members. Her camera is full of paintings ideas.  Her painting representative style reflects the calm water and scenery of the Pacific Northwest.  The views from her waterfront home and the constantly changing atmosphere outside keep her in painting mode until something distracts her.  Melanie is often caught between volunteering and finding time to pursue her painting

Being avid volunteers both Melanie and Randy like being involved in their community. Here are some of her volunteer and art related activities and accomplishments: Stanwood Camano Art Guild/SCAF Road Banner Project and Auctions; Stanwood Camano Arts Spring Show – First Place Award; Snow Goose Poster Winner in 2006; Snow Goose Festival Committee Volunteer – Snow Goose Festival Family Activities Program and Bird Art Show at Four Springs House and Lake Preserve; Stanwood Chamber of Commerce Office – Volunteer and Art walk; Gallery and Gallery Shows – Seagrass on Camano; Stanwood Camano Art Guild – Art In Public Places; Five Camano Arts Association Studio Tours; Camano Community Center Gala Auction Volunteer.

Travel, visiting friends and family, and spending time with her 3 young Grandchildren fill in her calendar. Trips to Las Vegas, Victoria BC, Disneyland, International Kite Festival and a 2,250 mile road trip down the West Coast inspired her minds eye this year. Trips to Alaska and Disneyland with her youngest granddaughter are already booked for 2019.

The Christmas in Miniature show opens on Saturday, December 1st. It runs through Saturday, December 8th. Sunnyshore Studio will be open both Saturdays 10:00am-5:00pm.

Christmas Poster 2018

 

 

Jason and Jenny Dorsey tried education reform in Indy before it became a popular political project

By Russ Pulliam, Associate Editor for The Indianapolis Star, director of the Pulliam Fellowship

Russel Pulliam

“Jason and Jenny Dorsey tried education reform in Indy before it became a popular political project.

A young pastor, Jason and his family checked out the Indianapolis Public Schools not long after 9/11. With four children, they had other options, including the new Oaks Academy. With classical curriculum and racial balance, it was popular in the Redeemer PCA congregation where he had become pastor near downtown Indianapolis in an area that was attracting an influx of middle class families.

Redeemer-Presbyterian-Church-1505-N-Delaware-St-01

They wondered if could all the bad things they heard about the city’s public schools could be that bad?

Students would get into fights. Teachers sometimes didn’t care and just showed up for work. IPS buildings were in poor shape. Students dropped out too easily. Too many parents didn’t care or were too young to discern how to care.

The Dorseys found another side of the IPS story. Jenny became PTA president at their children’s elementary school. She befriended teachers, principals and Superintendent Eugene White. Jason volunteered as a lunchroom supervisor at Tech High School. Then he became a baseball coach there and led a petition drive for capital improvements. They called their little group IPS Renewal. They thought Indianapolis could never be truly world class without excellence in IPS.

Elizabeth Odle was principal at IPS 14. She balanced love and discipline as families moved often and students brought the challenges of broken homes.

Jason's I-Phone 2013 016.JPG

When some of the Dorsey children were at Tech, the basketball team started to dominate the way city schools did back in the 1950s and 1960s. Tech took the school’s first state championship, in class 4A, in 2014, with a 27-2 record. The team won off-court victories, with an average GPA of 3.2. Star player Trey Lyles won the Trester Award for character and now plays for the Denver Nuggets.

 The Dorsey family has since moved back to their Seattle roots. They look back at IPS as a success for their family. Jason and some friends are finishing a documentary on the season, We Are Family, highlighting the ups and downs of the 2013-14 season.

With a kickstarter campaign, they hope to raise $25,000 to finish the film, using clips that Dorsey and others saved up from the season.

We Are Family Poster.jpg

Basketball is just a game, even in Indiana. For Tech High School, though, that championship season was a big off-court victory. They played in the Hoosiers film tradition of the underdog, yet not in a 1950s small country school. Their season showed that big city schools can overcome the obstacles of racial division, urban poverty and broken families and win championships in life.”

You can learn more about and support Sunnyshore Studio’s Kickstarter campaign to fund the completion of the We are Family Documentary by clicking on this link here:

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