Jason Dorsey’s Oregon Coast Collection is LIVE. Every day in October a new painting will be added to the online Gallery. This show will NOT be up in our bricks-and-mortar gallery on Camano but only here.

OREGON COAST COLLECTION

  • Each painting is an original, hand-crafted watercolor by Jason Dorsey of the iconic Oregon Coastline
  • None of the paintings will be made into prints. Your painting will be one-of-a-kind.
  • Most of these paintings are mated with two mats. The other mat is a warm off-white color. The inner mat highlights a color in the painting. A few of the paintings are framed. The exterior size of the mats or frames is listed. Read descriptions below each painting for details.
  • My goal is to make original art affordable and accessible. If you can’t pay the full price or would like to negotiate a trade, please contact me at 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com
  • Taxes and Shipping will be added to the final price.
  • Thank you for your support of our family of artists and our creative studio over the years. Your patronage makes our sharing beauty with the world possible.

Interested in purchasing a painting? Contact Jason Dorsey at 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 1: Astoria, Oregon

Our journey down the Oregon coasts starts in Astoria. Nestled in the northwest corner where the Columbia River meets the Pacific, the port city of Astoria is the oldest city. It is named after John Jacob Astor “an investor and entrepreneur from New York City, whose American Fur Company founded Fort Astoria and…established a monopoly in the fur trade in the early nineteenth century” (Wikipedia). I know it as the place to go in August to catch the big King Salmon that make their way from the Pacific up the Columbia to spawn. My childhood friends Steve, Harry and guide Scotty Landis have hooked some of those Kings. One evening after fishing we enjoyed dinner at a restaurant on the pier that juts in the water, the sun catching the houses, buildings, bridge and ships beyond in evening glow. The end to a perfect day.

To read about a memorable day fishing for King Salmon in Astoria click here

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 26″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To trade a fishing trip for the painting or negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 2: Sunset Beach, Oregon, SOLD!

Heading south from Astoria on Highway 101 we come to Sunset Beach State Recreation Site. This park marks the west trailhead of the historic Fort-to-Sea Trail: a 6.5 mile route that recreates the experience Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery encountered as they traveled between Fort Clatsop and the Pacific Ocean during the famous winter of 1805-6. Sunset Beach lives up to its name with “expansive views from Cape Disappointment to the north and Ecola State Park to the south.” This spring when my Mac crashed and I lost all the photos I was planning to use for the Oregon Coast Collection I reached out to friends on social media asking them to help me by sharing pictures of the Oregon coast. An old high school friend named Naomi reached out and shared a few pictures she had taken over the years. This sunset was one of them.

October 3: Seaside, Oregon: SOLD

From Astoria we head south on Highway 101 which winds along the coastline. If you’ve never driven Highway 101 add it to your bucket list. It is a north-south Highway that runs from Port Angelas, Washington, to Los Angeles, California. There are splendid views along the 1,550 miles. Many of those splendors can be seen along the Oregon Coast. After leaving Astoria heading south you there are no views of the Pacific until Seaside. There your heart leaps at the blue ocean stretching out forever, the cliff and rock formations, and if you are lucky enough, a sunset making the water and cliffs glow with light. Credit goes to Shutterstock for this photo.

October 4: Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach

Please Note: “Sunset at Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach and “Morning Glory at Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach” have SOLD!”

According to Wikipedia, Haystack Rock is a 235 feet tall sea stack in Cannon Beach, Oregon. It is the third tallest intertidal structure in the world and one of the most popular destinations on the Oregon coast. It is “adjacent to the beach and accessible by foot at low tide. The Haystack Rock tide pools are home to many intertidal animals, including starfish, sea anemone, crabs, chitons, limpets and sea slugs. The rock is also a nesting site for many sea birds including terns and puffins.” For me Haystack Rock is one of the defining images of the Oregon Coast. I have walked to and along its vastness and glory many times. You can read about one of those stories here:

One inspired morning I painted for “takes” on Haystack Rock. There was no way to capture its multi-faceted glory but I tried. The top left painting “Morning glory at Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach” displays the glory of morning. The top middle painting “Sunset at Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach” the glories of the fading sun, The top right painting “High noon at Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach” with the light directly overhead, and the bottom painting “Stormy Day at Haystack Rock, Cannon Beach.” Today I’m offering you a special deal. All the paintings are the same size. Here are the details.

Finally thanks to my friend from college Joel Gillespie who shared a photograph of Haystack Rock with me from which these paintings are based.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • These paintings are double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150 per painting
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 5: Haystack Rock Close Up

One of my favorite times at Haystack Rock was a trip that I took with my daughter Jackie in April 2017. What an adventure it was. Our first stop was dinner at McMenamins hotel, in McMinville, OR. We went to the theater and watched Beauty and the Beast. We stayed at Sage Meadows Bed and Breakfast. After a business meeting with a book publisher we headed to the Oregon Coast. We walked on Cannon Beach, had lunch at Moe’s and headed north on Highway 101. What a special time that was with my daughter. Here is a video of that special walk: I want to thank my friend Boon Lim for the photograph from which this painting is based.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 6: Cannon Beach, Oregon, Panorama, SOLD!

There is one more view of Cannon Beach that I must capture, a panorama of the whole scene with Haystack Rock and the layers of hills beyond and the ocean in all its surging power. The Pacific reminds me that I am a very small creature in a very big world and an immense universe that is vast beyond comprehension. The other thing that reminds me of my transience are the Tsunami signs that warn to run to high ground in the case of that natural disaster. There are many ways we mortals may die, and few that are to be desired. But to run through the sand to escape and incoming wave seems especially terrifying to me. Thus, wise and careful man that I am, I always look for the high ground that I will run for in the case of a Tsunami. I’m not sure how I would know one is coming. But at least I can be prepared to bolt. After noting the high ground, I am free to enjoy the sandy wildness and winds of the Oregon Coast. And with that reminder of our mortality, we head south on Highway 101 towards Tillamook.

October 7, Cannon Beach Sunrise, SOLD!

Our lave look at Cannon Beach are of these beach walkers enjoying the morning sunrise.

October 8: Oswald West State Park, Oregon

Oswald West State Park is located about ten miles south of Cannon Beach. My first visit there was on on Thanksgiving day in 2021. All of our kids scattered to the far winds: Jackie and Judah spent the day with Julian in Washington DC. Jacob drove up to spend Thanksgiving with my parents on Camano Island. So Jenny and I zipped down to Salem to be with her folks, Ron and Grace Wallace. Instead of making the traditional feast we decided to drive to the coast. We spent the afternoon exploring Oswald West State Park. It was a beautiful day with the sun breaking through the clouds, highlighting the water. In this painting I tried to capture the wildness of the ocean and the sparkle of the sun on the water.

You can read more of the story of that special day here:

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 26″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 9: Sunbreak at Oswald State Park, Oregon

This is my second take of Oswald State Park, trying to capture the sun breaking through the clouds and highlighting the water, making a silver-blue-white glow. Jenny and I had taken a stroll along the beach when I saw the sun breaking through and making the waters glow. The scene was breathtaking. It is one example of the joys and treasures you get when you walk the Oregon Coast.

You can read more about the artistry of walking the Oregon Coast here.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is framed. The frame is modern, dark brown wood, conservation glass and double mat.
  • Size: 20″ tall, 27″ wide
  • Price: $550
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 10: Oswald West State Park, Oregon

This is the last painting of Oswald State Park. I imagined what the setting sun would do the the rocky cliff and trees to the south of the cove. Imagination is essential to art. A photographer captures what is there; an artist sees into the essence and goes beyond the surface of realism to the impression of a moment, the feel of a place, a taste of an experience. I hope that I was able to do that with this painting. One artist friend pointed out that the foreground trees create a triptych (painting on three panels). I didn’t see that then but I see that now. Now from this special day at Oswald State Park we drive south on 101. What beach will be next?

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 26″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 11: Manzanita Beach, Oregon, SOLD!

We head south on Highway 101. With 362 miles of dramatic coastline, Oregon is a beach lover’s paradise. I have enjoyed many of those beaches. But, of course, many remain to be explored. One of this is Manzanita Beach on the north coast in Tillamook County, twenty-five miles south of Seaside and twenty-five miles north of Tillamook. Reading descriptions, it features a long stretch of pristine sand “perfect for lounging on our building sandcastles.” The beach ends at the base of Neahkahnie Mountain “creating a stunning creating a stunning backdrop and a great spot to view the striking coastline from above.”

I found this photo on Shutterfly. What struck me about it was the massive cliffs, the crashing waves along their edges, and their reflection in the sand.

October 12: Tillamook, Oregon

The city of Tillamook is located one the southeast end of Tillamook Bay. It is known as an agricultural center famous for its Tillamook Cheese Factory which has wonderful ice cream. I know it as the place where I fell in love with the Oregon Coast. You can read that story here.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 26″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 13: McPhillips Beach, Oregon

McPhillips Beach is part of the larger area that is Cape Kiwanda State Natural area. It is a lovely beach with lovely sea stacks, one which resembles Haystack Rock, great sand, and sandy cliffs or dunes and an impressive shoreline. The web site of the State Park has this to say: “This sandstone headland just north of Pacific City offers one of the best viewpoints on the coast for witnessing the ocean’s power. The landmark is one of three along the Three Capes Scenic Route (along with Cape Meares and Cape Lookout).  Your steep climb up the towering dune will be rewarded with scenes of waves pummeling rugged, twisting rocks and crevices. The fragile nature of sandstone means the ocean is constantly eroding and re-sculpting the entire scene, right before your eyes.” It is a great place to come with family and friends to play. I tell the story of a special fourth of July with my wife Jenny’s side of the family here.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 34.5″ wide
  • Price: $450
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 14: Cape Kiwanda, Oregon

The Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area is a treasure with many breaktaking views. From McPhillips Beach you can look south to see the sandy cliffs and sea stacks of the cape. It is also possible to climb to the top of the dune. From there you can look out on the vast Pacific as it crashes onto shore, twisting rocks and digging crevices in the sandstone. And if you can make your way around the Cape to the south side you would see a view like this of the sea stack and cliff lit by the setting sun.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 15: Devil’s Punchbowl

According to Wikipedia, “Devils Punch Bowl State Natural Area is a state day use park on the central Oregon Coast in the United States. It is centered on a large bowl naturally carved in a rock headland which is partially open to the Pacific Ocean. Waves enter the bowl and often violently churn, swirl, and foam.” I know it as a special day trip some of our family took with Jenny’s sister, Tina, and her family. That was a very fun day that I tell about here. In this painting I tried to capture the vibrant darks of the cliffs that make the bowl, the swirling waters, and the sun striking rocks in the foreground and through the hole in the wall.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 16: Agate Beach, SOLD!

I’ve been going to the Oregon coast with a girl named Jenny Marie Wallace since we were freshmen at Western Baptist College. In June 1992, Jenny became my wife. One of the beaches we have gone back to the most is Agate Beach just a little north of Newport. There is a lodge on the bluff above Agate Beach owned by the First Baptist Church of Salem called Seakrest. Members of the church are able to rent Seakrest at a great price. Jenny’s sister Tina and her husband Randy have been able to reserve Seakrest for Wallace family gatherings over a decade. I think our first time there was in 2010. Agate Beach has been a special place for Jenny’s side of the family to gather to play, feast, and be together. Like all families, we are broken and in need of God’s grace and healing. Still our time together has been treasured as sacred memory. This watercolor is my impression of a sunset from the deck at the lodge.

Read more about Jenny and my visits to the Oregon coast and Seakrest Lodge here.

October 17: Yaquina Head Lighthouse #1 and #2

The Yaquina Head Lighthouse was known early in its existence as Cape Foulweather Lightouse was established in 1873. It is located in Lincoln County, near the mouth of the Yaquina River near Newport. It is a short walk or jog from Seakrest. The tower stands 93 feet tall and is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon. The Yaquina Head Light was made in Paris in 1868 and first lit August 20, 1873. It was automated in 1966. A two-story keeper’s dwelling was built at the time at the lighthouse tower and its adjoining oil house was constructed. In 1923, a one-story keeper’s house was added a short distant to the east. In 1938, a one-story building replaced the original two story dwelling. Both dwellings and outbuildings were demolished in 1984. The light can be seen 19 miles out to sea. There is an interpretive center that shares the lighthouse’s history nearby. But I got this information from Wikipedia.

I got my impression of the lighthouse in the mist on a walk I took there. The mist was so thick that you couldn’t see the ocean at all. The sun on the lighthouse was magical.

I painted the first lighthouse painting (the one that you can see the ocean) not long after our trip. The second I did this morning.

PAINTING DETAILS: Lighthouse #1 (where you can see the ocean)

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 26″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

PAINTING DETAILS: Lighthouse #2 (where you can’t see the ocean)

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 18: Yaquina Head Woods #1 (SOLD!)

Just north of Seakrest is the Yaquina Lighthouse. It stands on a rock outcropping near the Yaquina River near Newport. On one of the family stays at Seakrest, Jenny and I walked to the lighthouse. It was a misty day. Before we got to the lighthouse we came upon a gravel road that led into the woods and up a hill. As we walked up the hill the sun shining through the mist made a holy and beautiful light that enveloped us. This is the first of four paintings that I’ve done to try to capture that moment. After I posted the painting on Facebook a friend reached out to me saying that he was interested in buying it. This painting is headed his way. I am reminded of the important synergy that exists between artists and those who buy their art, friends, collectors and patrons. Without your support, we could not do what we do. Michael, my old friend, I say THANK YOU from the bottom of my heart!

You can see photographs from that walk with Jenny here and here.

October 19: Yaquina Head Woods #2 and #3

This is the second of my takes on the misty woods above the Yaquina Head Lighthouse. In this painting I’ve added figures. It could be Jenny and I, or really any two part. Part of the magic of art is that the artist leaves a lot up to the imagination of the viewer. Really, these could be any woods on a misty day with any two people walking them. In the second painting on the right I wanted to suggest the vast ocean stretched out beyond the woods. It could be a mother and child, or grandmother and child. Again, the artist leaves it open to the imagination of the viewer. Both of these paintings capture something, but not all, of the scene that day.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • These paintings are double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 26″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 20: Yaquina Head Woods #4 SOLD!

This is the last of my impressions of the misty woods about the Yaquina Head Lightghouse. I was happy enough with this painting that entered into in the Pacific Northwest Watercolor Society International Exhibit. Sadly it wasn’t selected as one of the final paintings. There is a brilliance of light in it that I’m quite happy with. This is one of the paintings that I had framed. I have to say it looks quite striking in a frame!

October 21: Sunset at Yaquina Head, Oregon

Let’s linger just a little longer at Yaquina Head. The sunset matches the bright lighthouse light. Yaquina Head juts up dark and strong against the lights. And the colors of the sunset dance on the calm waters.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com.

October 22: Kites at Newport Beach, Oregon #1 & #2. PAINTING #1 IS SOLD!

Just south of Yaquina Head is the bustling town of Newport. This is what their visitor’s guide says: “Bordering on both the Pacific Ocean and the large Yaquina Bay, Newport is so many things combined into one remarkable place. An active working waterfront, the Historical Bayfront area is home to one of Oregon’s largest commercial fishing fleets. It is also an intriguing cultural district, with shops, art galleries, chowder houses, and restaurants right next to fish processing plants and historic buildings. A second distinct area of town, Nye Beach, was the number one attraction on the Coast during the early 1900s, and is still a popular haven for the arts. Newport has not one but two lighthouses — the original lighthouse on Yaquina Bay, and a second lighthouse built in the late 1800s on Yaquina Head, north of town. At 93 feet tall, the Yaquina Head Lighthouse is the tallest active lighthouse in Oregon. The Oregon Coast Aquarium is world class and grants passage to mesmerizing turquoise tunnels and large tanks filled with colorful fish, sharks, and even stranger creatures. Not to be outdone on striking landmarks, the Yaquina Bay Bridge is an iconic, art-deco arch bridge on Highway 101 that spans the bay.”

I decided that it was time to show how fun the beach is for children. The painting on the left shows brothers flying a kite in the evening light; the painting on the right a young girl (or it could be a boy) flying a kite with the waves crashing to the shore. With the soothing crash of the waves on the shore, the cry of seagulls, and a beach that stretches on and on, children are in heaven.

PAINTING DETAILS FOR PAINTING #2

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 23: Heceta Head Lighthouse, Oregon

Heading south on 101, thirteen miles north of Florence is the iconic Heceta Head Lighthouse, one of the most photographed on the Oregon Coast. “It is named after the Spanish explorer Bruno de Heceta, who explored the Pacific Northwest during the late 18th century…Built in 1894, the 56-foot tall lighthouse shines a beam visible for 21 nautical miles, making it the strongest light on the Oregon Coast (Wikipedia).” Perched atop 1,000-foot-high Heceta Head, the lighthouse has a dramatic view of the vast Pacific. I tried to capture the massive and powerful ocean and its surging waters against the sunlit rock outcropping, and diminutive but bold lighthouse, with its houses for the lighthouse keeper and assistant which is now a Bed and Breakfast Inn.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted and framed using conservation glass
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 24: Florence, Oregon Sand Dunes, SOLD!

According to the Eugene, Cascades and Coasts web site, “Oregon’s city of Florence is connected to a 40-mile stretch of sand dunes known as the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area, North America’s largest coastal dunes. Filled with sandy hills that reach up to 500 ft in height, this is one playground you won’t want to miss out on….In Florence, the dunes touch everything….Oregon’s sand dunes are a thriving, diverse ecosystem. Sparkling lakes, creeks and wetlands run through them. Animals prowl, birds nest and pine trees tower. Plants, adapted to the ever shifting terrain, take root.” I visited the dunes near Florence for the first time in high school on a trip with my church’s youth group. We road ATVs and had a blast. It was so much fun that on our honeymoon Jenny and I spent a day riding ATVs on the dunes. You have to be careful though. The dunes have dangerous drop offs that are hard to see. In this painting I tried to capture the mist being burned off and sun lighting the dunes, making them sparkle. Doesn’t a walk on the dunes in that sun sound great?

October 25: Battle Rock

From Florence we head south on 101 to Port Orford and an isolated sea stack named Battle Rock. Battle Rock Park is named for the historic battle that took place at Battle Rock where the Qua-to-mah Native Americans fought Captain William Tichenor’s men in 1851. The battle actually occurred on the rock pictured here.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com.

October 26: McCullough Bridge, Coos Bay, Oregon

Heading south on 101 we come to Coos Bay and the Conde B. McCullough Memorial Bridge. There is lots of nature’s beauty along the coast. Only a few places are man made structures impressive enough to demand attention. This is one. According to Wikipedia, it “is a cantilever bridge that spans Coos Bay on the U.S. Route 101 near North Bend, Oregon. When completed in 1936 it was named the North Bend Bridge. In 1947 it was renamed in honor of Conde B. McCullough who died May 5, 1946….The Conde B. McCullough Memorial Bridge replaced ferries that had formerly crossed the bay. The bridge is outstanding for its attention to form and detail, and has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places in recognition of its design and cultural and economic importance.

I’m sure that Coos Bay residents and visitors have stories about and memories of the bridge. One friend shared with me a photograph she took from the bridge the day after she said thank you and see you later to her Mama. She writes, “Jesus took her Home to Heaven from Coos Bay. It will always be a special place to me.”

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 27: Shore Acres, Oregon, #1 & #2

Heading south of Highway 101, thirteen miles south of Coos Bay, we come to Shore Acres State Park. It is one of three state parks along the Cape Arago Highway. A web site for Oregon State Parks describes it this way: “Perched on craggy sandstone cliffs high above the ocean, Shore Acres State Park celebrates two sorts of beauty: ruggedly organic and artfully constructed.” I have not had the opportunity to personally visit Shore Acres. I learned about it from Naomi Ulsted, a friend from Stanwood High School and a very talented writer. Here is how that happened. This August my Mac crashed and I lost all my photographs on it, including the ones of Oregon that I had set aside to use as references for my Oregon Coast Collection of paintings. I reached out on Facebook and asked friends to share with me any photographs along the Oregon coast that they might have. Naoi was one of those people who reached out to me and shared some photos, including this dramatic scene from Shore Acres.

I wanted to put on paper the feel of the cold and wild of winter at the Ocean, the grey sky with morning light and the crash of the cold grey waves against the rock outcropping jutting out. I like how this painting got some of that mood!

I took a second shot at Shore Acres. Here is that painting.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • Both of these paintings are double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 28: Cape Blanco, Oregon Lighthouse, SOLD!

Driving south on Highway 101 we come to the Cape Blanco the westernmost tip of Oregon and the charming lighthouse that looks out over the Pacific. The web site for Oregon State Parks has this to say: Built in 1870, Cape Blanco Lighthouse is the oldest standing lighthouse on the Oregon coast…Cape Blanco features a 19th-century lighthouse and an early Irish settler’s home. Use our private, sheltered campsites as your base camp while you enjoy the park’s history, trails and rugged coastline. More than eight miles of hiking trails lead to the beach, viewpoints of ocean vistas, fishing spots along the Sixes River, and the lighthouse. On horseback, follow a seven-mile trail or enjoy a 150-acre open riding area across from the horse camp.

A friend of mine named Gerald shared the photo from which this painting is based. I imagined a stormy day with high winds and dark clouds and the sun breaking through and lighting a gold, green and brown swath to the lighthouse.

October 29: Foxgloves near Gold Beach, Oregon, SOLD!

On our journey down the Oregon coast we’ve come to Gold Beach, a place that I’ve never been. But it has a wonderful name and it makes me want to visit. I have to rely on others for my resources. This painting was painted from a photograph I found on Shutterstock of sea stacks between Brookings and Gold Beach. In researching more of the Gold Beach area I came across a photographer named Len Saltiel who has a photography website and blog called Lens EyeView Photography. He writes this:

“There are so many beautiful spots along the Oregon Coast that it is hard to choose which one is my favorite. Of course, the Oregon Coast is 363 miles long, so it is quite impossible to pick a favorite, as it would probably take a lifetime to explore every inch of it. Given that is the case, I will qualify that Gold Beach is my personal favorite of all of the spots along the coast that I have visited.”

I like the warm colors in this painting and the foxgloves dancing in the ocean breeze.

October 30: Sea Stacks Near Gold Beach, Oregon

This is another painting from a photograph resource of the sea stacks near Gold Beach. Highway 101 winds along the coast here giving spectacular views. I imagined the white, frothy surf and dark background shrouded in clouds and dark foreground in the shadow with a burst of sun on the hill and trees on the left of the painting. I think it worked.

PAINTING DETAILS

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 16″ tall, 20″ wide
  • Price: $150
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com

October 30: Oregon Coast Viewpoint, SOLD!

This viewpoint could be many places along the long Oregon coastline. It happens to be a view that you can see north of Gold Beach. I like this painting’s atmospheric feel.

October 31: Oregon Coast Glory

This painting could be many places along the Oregon coast with its windswept trees and turquoise waves. It might even be Cape Sebastian, one of the last beaches on the Oregon Coast before California. My resource this painting was Vintage Watercolor Artist and Master Teacher Jerry Stitt. I copied one of his paintings for this. I love how Jerry’s paintings are so fresh and vibrant and loose and how their composition is simple but striking. And with this painting my Oregon Coast Collection is complete!

  • This painting is double matted (not framed). The mat and backing board are covered with a plastic sleeve
  • Size: 20″ tall, 26″ wide
  • Price: $350
  • To negotiate a pay-what-you-can-price contact Jason Dorsey @ 317.209.6768 or j.dorsey23@gmail.com