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Home: Exploring the places of the heart, new artwork by Jed Dorsey

Sunnyshore Studio is thrilled to announce the date is set for Jed Dorsey’s October show. Home: Exploring the places of the heart will open on Saturday, October 20th.

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The show will feature new artworks by Jed. In his paintings Jed will explore how places become symbolic of home and how the sense of “being home” is deeply rooted in place.

For Islanders, Jed’s painting of the “gateway” to Camano, used for the promotion for the show, evokes that sense of home. How many of us felt that we had “come home” as we drive on 522 over the Stillaguamish River and look north across the marshy waters lit by the sunset to the Skagit Bay and blue and purple hills beyond.

When The Sun Paints The Sky

Partly because Jed’s painting’s wonderfully evoke this sense of home, they are purchased by collectors all over the United States. His last show at Sunnyshore Studio all but sold out. To meet the growing nationwide demand for his art, Sunnyshore Studio will make Jed’s Home: Exploring the places of the heart show available online. So if you are not able to attend the show at our Gallery on Camano you will be able to purchase your Jed Dorsey original through Sunnyshore Studio’s web site.

We are very thankful that Jed’s good friend and teammate from his Stanwood High School Days, Russell Bumgarner, and his company, Rubumco Painting Inc. is sponsoring the show.  Rubumco does great work built on years of experience, and based on character and integrity all over the Stanwood-Camano area. Check them out here: http://rubumco.com

Russel Baumgarner

Russell has been a great friend and support to Jed, and to the entire Dorsey family. His friendship, patronage and sponsorship will help us with the promotion of the show and in hosting a big party worthy of the occasion.

 

 

 

Explore the beautiful places and special people of Camano with Jason Dorsey (1)

On my summer break and in between many projects – working at my parent’s home on Camano, painting for my second children’s book, and working on my daughter’s tiny house (to name a few) – I’ve found time to explore some of the beautiful places and special people of Camano. Come with me and #Discoverbeautifulcamano.

Mabana Beach

For me, summer vacation begins with taking a dip in the sparkling waters of Mabana Beach. It was not so sunny and sparkly but my son Jacob and I jumped in nonetheless.

Dotti Burton’s Garden

A fellow artist of the Camano Arts Association, Dotti Burton, had invited me to tour her garden. One morning Jacob and I did, and it was truly amazing. It inspired me to add a new category to the Discover Beautiful Camano book and documentary project: the gardens of Camano. Dotti was gracious enough to be interviewed on the spot.

Touring the Island with Scott and Ashley Miller

A few days after our time with Dotti, my best friend from college, Scott Miller and his daughter Ashley came to Camano to spend time with us. One day I spontaneously decided to take them on a tour of “my island” and this is a record of that tour.

Our first stop was at my parent’s home. Where Dad’s studio, the original “Sunnyshore Studio” was. Ashley was a good sport to be in the video.

From Dad and Mom’s we headed south. Our next stop was at Tyee Corner Grocery where we enjoyed delicious hamburgers. Scott ate his without the bun because he was in a weight loss contest with his mom. I interviewed the store’s owner.

We continued south. Our plan was to stop at artists John and Vicki Ringen’s home, but they were driving out as we pulled in, so we pressed on to the south end of the Island. Looking over the high cliffs of Camano to the waters below is one of my favorite vistas of Camano.

After racing back from the south end to show some visitors who had come all the way from Illinois to see Sunnyshore Studio, we continued around the Island, now heading our north.

We stopped at the fabulous Matzke Gallery and Sculpture Park. A Raku firing event was taking place, but Karla was gracious enough to share a little bit about her Gallery and Park. She is one of the driving forces behind our “colony of artists” on Camano.

Our next stop was at Bill and Marilyn Christenson Wayland’s home. Bill was my pastor during my growing up years. He pastored Camano Chapel for 28 years, and he and his family are a landmark on Camano.

We continued our drive north along the west side of the Island. Our next stop was Huntington Grocery Store, which carries a remarkable amount of fishing and recreational gear as well as food and candy for its size.

After Huntington’s we stopped at Madrona Beach. A youngster who must have been bored came out of his modern style beach home and we had competitions of rock throwing accuracy. We took this video at the place where Dad used to launch his boat if we didn’t use the State Park’s ramp.

I had a birthday party to attend at my sister, April’s, farm on the north side of the Island, so Scott, Ashley, Jacob and I took a break from our tour. After the party I stopped at Scott’s aunt Linda and uncle Mike’s beautiful home overlooking the Camano Country Club. This is the view we saw. The video really doesn’t do it justice.

Scott and I are both pastors and on vacation, so we decided to have our own worship service on the lower deck at his aunt and uncle’s home the next morning. We had a sweet time of reading Scripture, singing, praying and sharing encouragement.

On Sunday afternoon Scott, who is a good golfer and I, who am a rather poor golfer, challenged my dad, who is a terrific golfer for his age, and Mike who is a solid golfer to a little competition at Camaloch Golf Course. It was a beautiful evening. Scott and I ended up… (I’ll leave you in suspense).

I said goodbye to Scott and Ashley the next morning. It was a sweet time of friendship. Scott brings out the fun, playful side of me like few people can.

Camano Commons and Naked City Brewery

The next couple of days Jacob and I worked hard at my parent’s home: cleaning off the old shake roof that Dad installed well over 30 years ago. We also dug out a drainage ditch on east foundation of their house. After working hard I was famished. I decided to treat Jacob to dinner at the Naked City Brewery, a gourmet hamburger restaurant, at the Camano Commons.

My old friend and classmate at Stanwood High School, Randi Robinson Armstrong, works there and it was fun to see her. She is one of the many special people that make Camano such a great place.

 Work Party and Iverson Beach

Jacob and I were working hard to prepare for a work party at Mom and Dad’s home that happened July 21st. One highlight of that work party was that an old friend of mine, John Kandel, was visiting with his wife April and four strapping sons. They joyfully joined in the work party with us, and afterwards we went to Iverson beach where they kids built a raft out of huge logs. It took some serious engineering to get the three logs into the water.

A number of us poled and pushed the raft to my sister April’s farm. Well, in reality, we ran aground over 100 yards from the beach and had to wade through thigh high mud and clay. I laughed and laughed at the site. Then we had to walk barefoot through the fields to the farmhouse. The trek was worth it. We enjoyed a delicious dinner.

In the midst of all that work and fun, I’ve found time to paint. I’m really excited about how my watercolor paintings for my second children’s book are coming together. I feel like I’m coming back to the freshness, looseness and spontaneity that I love most about watercolor.

One evening I painted Plein Air at Utsalady Beach. What a beautiful place that is.

This is the end of this exploration of the beautiful places and special people of Camano. I’m hoping to do at least one more video tour before my vacation is up. But even then I’ll only be scratching the surface of this place!

 

Work has begun on Jackie’s Tiny House

A couple of years ago Jackie Dorsey shared her dream to build a tiny house at Sunnyshore Studio where she could retreat, do creative work and get away from technology. (I’m going to hold her to that “no technology” phrase :).

We promised Jackie that we would build a tiny house for her. But that was a big commitment and I’m not that good at construction work. So it was all a bit overwhelming.

Until Jenny stumbled across a do-it-yourself shed at Costco that she thought would be a perfect tiny house for Jackie. Jackie agreed.

Two weeks ago it was delivered to Sunnyshore Studio. Today we started work on Jackie’s tiny house.

Jackie and Jacob did some excavation work.

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We laid the “cornerstone”. Not so much a stone, but the corner from which everything else is measured.

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Dad “just happened” the foundation blocks at his house and donated them to the cause. He came through for us again, and even lent a hand.

We have lots of work ahead of us. But we have a good start and it will be fun to see the tiny house take shape!

You’ll have to come visit Jackie’s tiny house someday. She wants it to be a place of rest and creativity.

Discover Beautiful Mabana Beach

By Jason Dorsey

I officially started my vacation with a dip at Mabana Beach.  My son Jacob and I had spent the morning and early afternoon working on some landscaping projects at the Studio, including putting in another bulkhead and planting hydrangea bushes Mom had given me.

We were hot and tired and decided to go for a swim.

Mabana is the closest public beach to Sunnyshore Studio and it’s the beach my mom had played at since 1947 when she was growing up on her family’s farm half-a-mile north of Mabana.

I have lots of memories of swimming at Mabana when I was a kid too.

Jacob and I parked Dad’s old Ford truck at the top of the hill because I wasn’t confident in its brakes working on the steep and narrow drive down to Mabana. Earlier in the day it had been sunny and warm. But by the time Jacob and I got there it was overcast and windy. No one else was there.

That didn’t dampen our spirits. We waded into the white-top waves. Jacob dove in first. I have to give him credit for that. The water wasn’t bad, in fact it was warm because the tide was high and the water had come up over the sand heated by the sun.

As we sat drying off, I told Jacob a little of the story of how my Uncle Robert and Aunt Sandy had fought to keep Mabana accessible to the public. I tell that story, and more of the history of Mabana here:

The Beaches of Camano: The Battle for Mabana

You can learn more about Mabana Beach here: Beaches of Camano: Mabana Beach

 

Help Me Discover Beautiful Camano Island

By Jason Dorsey

I grew up on Camano Island. But much of its history and many of its places and people are still unknown to me.

I’ve a project called Discover Beautiful Camano Island so that I can learn more about this place I love and so that I can sharing its stories, its people and its beauty with others.

This summer on my vacation I will be exploring the places, people and stories of Camano. I will share what I learn through a series of blog posts and videos. I will also begin to paint Camano’s “places”.

My dream is that this project will culminate in Sunnyshore Studio’s publication of the book Discover Beautiful Camano Island, the release of a documentary video about Camano, and a show featuring artworks of Camano Island artists selected to paint the places of Camano.

Stanwood-Camano friends, I need your help in deciding what places to feature and what people to interview.  The big categories that I’m working with are: Farms, Parks, Hikes, Public Beaches, Churches, Art Galleries/Studios, Stores/Markets/Shopping, Recreation venues (like Camaloch Golf course), and Historic Buildings.

But I’m also open to special places that don’t fit into these categories.

WHAT ARE THE PLACES AND WHO ARE THE PEOPLE I SHOULD FEATURE IN MY BOOK?

If you know of any special Camano places, people or stories please let me know at: sunnsyhorestudio@gmail.com.

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20th Annual Studio Tour Guest Artist: Melanie Serroels

Sunnyshore Studio is thrilled to have our neighbor and the Vice President of the Camano Arts Association, Melanie Serroels, as one of our guest artist for the 20th Annual Camano Island Studio Tour.  Mark Your Calendars for the 20th Anniversary Camano Island Mother’s Day Studio Tour this May   Melanie does so much to make the arts hum on Camano, and we’re thrilled to be able to showcase her sparkling watercolors.

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Sunnyshore Studio: Tell us about yourself.

Melanie: I’ve always lived in the Pacific Northwest.   I grew up in Portland, moved to Redmond WA in 1988 and became a full time resident on Camano in 2010. I spend most of my time volunteering for Camano Arts Association. Currently I’m serving as the Vice President, Acting Secretary, Volunteer Hours Recorder, and Website Committee member. I have a home studio. My husband and I are retired.  We enjoy traveling the USA seeing friends and visiting our national parks.

Sunnyshore Studio: How did you get started in art?

Melanie: Art has always been a part of my life. My parents were creative and I received good general art instruction throughout my elementary and high school education. I started taking watercolor instruction from a professional artist in1973. My style, technique, and palette is still influenced by my first art instructor, Charles Mulvey.  I have also taken watercolor workshops from Robert Landry, Thomas William Jones, and Jack Dorsey.  I enjoyed learning to use acrylics from Dianna Shyne, and Jed Dorsey.

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What has been your journey as an artist?

Melanie: I think the turning point in my painting career was moving to Camano Island and waking up everyday to the beauty and changing atmosphere outside my window.  When we first moved here I was possessed with painting whatever my eyes landed on.  I painted almost every day.  Today, I’m busy with lots of other activities, but I enjoy using that artist’s eye to observe and plan paintings of many beautiful scenes on Camano Island.

I don’t really feel it’s been a journey as much as it’s been a life’s practice to do creative things.  I have many interests, but being creative and creating art has always been my go to for personal satisfaction.  Sometimes it’s not doing, but sharing what I do, and helping others realize that they can do it too. 

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Sunnyshore Studio: What about your future as an artist?

Melanie: I was juried onto the Camano Island Studio Tour in 2009, and participated in the tour for four years.  I’ve also sold my paintings through our local galleries.  I regularly donate my paintings to fundraising auctions for local charities.  I’ve also been active in art mentoring programs, working with young artists at local schools.

Sunnyshore Studio: Why are you excited to participate in the 20th Annual 2018 Studio Tour at Sunnyshore Studio? 

Melanie: Over the past six years, painting has taken a back seat to life.  I am grateful for Jason and Jenny’s encouragement to get back into painting and exhibiting my work here at Sunnyshore Studios.  New works are starting to dance in my head and painting feels scary and good! 

20th Annual Studio Tour Guest Artist: Judy Sullivan

Sunnyshore Studio is thrilled to have the gifted Judy Sullivan as one of our guest artist for the 20th Annual Camano Island Studio Tour.  Mark Your Calendars for the 20th Anniversary Camano Island Mother’s Day Studio Tour this May We think you’ll love the paintings of this Camano Island artist.

Sunnyshore Studio: Tell us about yourself? 

Judy: I’ve been living on Camano Island, for about five years now, in the Country Club neighborhood.  Prior to living in Washington State, there was Kansas, Texas, even Pennsylvania.  Along the way, I’ve been active in Art clubs and Artist Associations, including the Kansas Watercolor Society, Wichita Women’s Artists, and the Camano Arts Association.  I’ve shown my work in several galleries throughout the years, including the Top of the Line Gallery in Fort Worth, Buffalo Trails Gallery in Jackson Hole, and of course the Seagrass Gallery on Camano Island. 

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Sunnyshore Studio: How did you get started in art? Describe how you got started, what were influences and encouragements, turning points.

Judy: There has never been a time in my life without Art.  My earliest memories are of drawing horses and other animals.  

Sunnyshore Studio: What has been your journey as an artist? Tell us something about your journey as an artist. What have been some of the significant milestones, turning points, achievements.

Judy: My High School Art teacher was a great influence, helping me choose art as a career.  I went on to get a degree in Art from the University of Arkansas and was thrilled to be accepted into the Top of the Line Gallery in Fort Worth, Texas within a year of graduating.  

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Sunnyshore Studio: What about your future as an artist? Where do you hope to go with your art? Where would you like to be in five years?

Judy: I hope to someday have my home studio on the Camano Arts Association Home Studio Tour.

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Sunnyshore Studio: Why are you excited to participate in the 20th Annual 2018 Studio Tour at Sunnyshore Studio? 

Judy: I was fortunate to have my work shown on previous tours at the Seagrass Gallery in Terry’s Corner.  But, since their closing, I have been “Gallery-less in Seattle”.    I can’t even begin to describe how thrilling it was to be invited as a guest artist at Sunnyshore Studio.  The Mother’s Day Studio Tour is one of the best Art events in the world, and it’s a true honor to be showing and sharing my art here.

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20th Annual Studio Tour Guest Artist: Amanda Pearson

Sunnyshore Studio is thrilled to have the fabulous Amanda Pearson as one of our guest artist for the 20th Annual Camano Island Studio Tour.  Mark Your Calendars for the 20th Anniversary Camano Island Mother’s Day Studio Tour this May Amanda comes all the way from St. Paul, MN and we think you’ll love the colorful, playful and detailed artwork of this emerging artist.

Sunnyshore Studio: Tell us about yourself:

Amanda: I currently live in Richfield, MN (just south of Minneapolis). I grew up in Portland, OR and moved out to the Twin Cities for college. But now I’m married and bought a house, so I’ll be here for a while even though the Pacific Northwest will always be my home. My husband is fantastic and is always supportive of whatever schemes I get us into. We have two cats and they are rambunctious and endlessly entertaining, although they do not appreciate when I spend more time on my art projects than hanging out with them.

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Sunnyshore Studio: How did you get started in art?

Amanda: I was an “artistic” kid. My childhood was spent making various doodads. I remember making a VHS player and videotape out of paper, and a briefcase out of a box that I took to school instead of a backpack (I was super cool). When I was waiting for my parents to be done talking to people after church on Sunday mornings, I would take the weekly bulletins and make little furniture or miniature scenes out of them.

In 3rd and 4th grade, I made a name for myself in my elementary school for making the best dioramas. Then in junior high and high school, my art classes were the best parts of my days (I always took as many as I could). I look back on the projects that I did in those days, and even in my freshman year of high school I was gluing sand or sugar or baking soda to fulfill whatever the assignment was. My mom “fondly” remembers all of the urgent trips to Michaels or the art store to try to make it before they closed on Sunday because of a last-minute scramble to finish something before it was due on Monday. In college, I majored in art education and graduated with my Bachelors in Visual Arts Education K-12. While my actual occupation is currently not art-related, I’ve found ways in my adulthood to incorporate art – I’ve taught elementary kids in an after-school art program, and taken community education art classes to keep me in this back in the days when I didn’t have the space or time to dedicate to it that I do now.

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Sunnyshore Studio: What has been your journey as an artist?

Amanda: It took me a little while to figure out how to incorporate art into my life after graduating. I had my art education degree, but wasn’t convinced I wanted to work as a teacher in a school. I spent a couple of years working retail and in a coffee shop, and then I secured a corporate job in the mortgage industry. Cubicles are not conducive to creativity. I did make sure to work in times to still create – since I was working a lot of hours and didn’t have a dedicated art space in my rented rooms/apartments, I decided that I would take a community education introduction to painting class. I enrolled over and over again, not because I wanted to learn the color wheel REALLY well, but because I could sit in the back and just paint. That way, there were a few hours a week where I had to make something. Painting has never been my favorite thing, but doing this enabled me to keep art a part of my life even when I had so many excuses for it to fall by the wayside. Each session, the other people taking the class were mostly empty-nesters or others who had the same tale of enjoying art when they were younger but with jobs and families and all the obligations that come with those, hadn’t made anything in 20+ years and wanted to go back to that part of who they were. I didn’t want that to be my story, but I could see how easily that could happen. So I kept taking the classes. Eventually with my corporate job, I was able to work less than 60 hours a week and had more time to do what I wanted.

Over the last few years, I started to move away from the once-a-week painting sessions and focused on the gluing projects. The reason was very practical at first – I wanted to make stuff but didn’t have the space, so I focused on methods that were portable. That way, I could go and work in Starbucks instead of being stuck in my apartment. So that’s what I would do! I would put whatever project I had in a pillow case and bring my Elmer’s glue bottle and bag of string and make my way to the nearest coffee place. It was not the most efficient way of doing projects that were already incredibly time-consuming, but I was able to finish one or two a year this way. I didn’t show them much, but joined a local art center and participated in their semi-annual member shows (and won a blue ribbon on one of my pieces). Then, my husband and I bought a house. It was a nerve-racking experience. I had gone into it with space for an art studio on my “please please have” list, but after our 5th rejected offer and skyrocketing housing prices, I thought I would have to sacrifice this (and my must-have of a second bathroom). But! We found our house! With a room on the main floor that made a perfect art studio. With my pieces, time is the biggest factor. Being able to have a spot where I could go to every day, even if I had only a few minutes, has made it possible for me to be much more productive and pour myself into this piece of what I do.

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I also needed to find my niche. Like I mentioned, painting is not a creative outlet that drives me. I also don’t have much patience for drawing. So what would I do? What would be my thing? What would be the way that I would express my ideas and views on the world? It came to me one night – at the time I didn’t realize it would be such a turning point, but it ended up changing everything. It was a Saturday night. I knew that I wanted my next project to be of Oneonta Falls in Oregon, but I didn’t want to paint it. Then it hit me – I wanted to glue embroidery floss instead. Well, I didn’t have that material at the time, and it was 10 o’clock on a Saturday night and I absolutely HAD to start and could not wait. So I went to Wal-Mart and bought some embroidery floss from their limited assortment and some little scissors, found some cardboard, and went to work. I was so proud of it, and I still am. Looking at it now, I can see a lot of flaws and things that I have learned with the medium since then, but I still am inspired by that moment and what came from it. It returned me to my instincts and tapped into what has driven me to “make” since I was a kid.

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Sunnyshore Studio: What about your future as an artist?

Amanda: Since I have now amassed a decent-sized portfolio, I am transitioning away from just making projects for myself to put on my walls for my own personal gallery. At this point, I am trying to find ways to share what I’ve made with others, through displaying art in public places that host artists, selling prints and smaller pieces at art shows, and participating in group shows at galleries such as this one. It is overwhelming at times and I am learning a lot. It is also scary – I am used to critiques from all of the art classes I have taken, but these pieces were made for personal reasons, and I’m putting them out there for strangers to have an opinion on. I have gotten a lot of very positive feedback and some good pointers as well, and I hope to keep learning and pushing myself to be better and share my work with others.

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Sunnyshore Studio: Why are you excited to participate in the 2018 – 20th annual! – Camano Island  Studio Tour at Sunnyshore Studio?

Amanda: The studio is an amazing place. Jason is my father’s cousin and my father grew up in the area, and this is a really special way to be connected even though I live so far away. It is an honor to have been asked to participate. There is something so special about an area coming together in a creative endeavor like an open art studio tour. The Dorsey’s and other artists who are showing at the studio are fantastic and their work is beautiful, so I am so excited for this opportunity to display along with them.

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Meanderings between an old and new Studio

Most kids are not privileged to have an art studio next to their house. I was one who did.

In 1969, when I was just a few months old, my dad and mom moved to Camano Island to ten acres with a weathered white house and some old fox sheds for my dad to make a go of it as an artist.

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Dad converted one of the old fox sheds into a studio and called it “Sunnyshore Studio”, named after the “Sunnyshore Acres” section of Camano of which our property was a part.

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It was in that studio that I watched dad paint, and at age 16 painted a full sheet watercolor myself and realized that I had talent as an artist.

For many years I dreamed of building a studio on a plot of ground my parents had given to Jenny and I, which was also a part of “Sunnyshore Acres”, just a couple of hundred feet  south of my parent’s home.

That dream came true, when our family  moved back to Washington State after 13 years of my serving as a pastor of a Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis, IN. By God’s grace, we were able to build the new Sunnyshore Studio to showcase our family of artists and to share the beauty of Camano with the world.

This Monday, on my Sabbath day, I pilgrimaged up to my new Studio.

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I spent the day working outside. It was a beautiful day, and I find yard work at the Studio one of the most relaxing things of all.

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I puttered around, planting new Shasta daisies in Jenny’s Daisy flower bed, a Clematis vine along the fence, and three Hydrangea bushes that mom had given me.

I worked on a biography of my mentor, Otto Sather, and did some reading and note taking for my upcoming sermon series on 2 Corinthians.

But I also found myself wandering back to my childhood home and meandering outside, enjoying the flowers that grow so abundantly there tended and cared for as they are by mom.

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And circling around the old studio where I had spent so many hours of my youth.

 

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I also hiked down into the woods and took some photographs that will serve as subject matter for my next children’s book: I Remember Running Through the Woods. And the woods were lovely, dark and deep.

Then I made my way back to the new Sunnyshore Studio and painted a watercolor of a Beach Treasure washed to shore on the south end of Camano.

I can’t help in these meanderings to think of what an honor and privilege it has been for me to have access to art studio’s over my lifetime: places of creativity and culture making, places of making and doing and rest and renewal.

Mark Your Calendars for the 20th Anniversary Camano Island Mother’s Day Studio Tour this May

Sunnyshore Studio is excited to participate in the 20th Anniversary Camano Island Studio Tour and welcome the thousands of people who will make the pilgrimage down to the south end of Camano to view the many studios and galleries here.

The Studio Tour opens on Mother’s Day weekend, Friday, May 11th and runs Saturday, May 12th and Sunday, May 13th (10am-5pm) with an Encore Weekend, Saturday, May 19th and Sunday, May 20th (10am-5pm). 

Sunnyshore Studio will represent five generations of artists of the Dorsey family:

Fanny Y. Cory

Matriarch of our family of artists

Jack Dorsey

Father of Jason, April (Nelson), and Jed

Ann Cory

Granddaughter of Fanny Y. Cory and wife of Jack Dorsey

Jason Dorsey

Son of Jack Dorsey and Ann Cory

April Dorsey

Daughter of Jack Dorsey and Ann Cory

 

Jed Dorsey

Son of Jack Dorsey and Ann Cory

Julian Dorsey

Son of Jason Dorsey

Jackie Dorsey

Daughter of Jason Dorsey

 

We are especially thrilled to welcome Jed Dorsey back to Washington State! He will have just arrived the week of the Mother’s Day show and we can’t wait to share his epic artwork with old and new collectors.

We will also be featuring three guests artist which we’ll be introducing you to over the next month.

Mark your calendars for the Studio tour. And make sure to stop by Studio #5 as you enjoy Camano’s colony of artists and natural beauty. You won’t want to miss this event!

 

 

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