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Meet Kourtnie Baird

Sunnyshore Studio loves to encourage young, emerging artists. Kourtnie Baird is such an artist. It is especially exciting to us to have her in our upcoming Christmas on Camano art show because she’s a talented artist, but also because her dad, Harry, is a lifelong friend of Jason Dorsey, Artistic Director at Sunnyshore Studio.

Meet emerging artist Kourtnie Baird.


Sunnyshore Studio: tell us about yourself and your art.

Kourntie: “I’ve loved art since I was young. I think it was because of the way it brought colors to emotions or made my imagination soar. I delved in it as a preteen then after becoming a mother in my early 20’s I found myself again through my artwork. I like to say that it puts flame to my lit candle that most of us tend to allow to dim over the years. Losing passion and then finding it again in the small things in life. I have always wanted to tell stories through my art or convey my own feelings into meaning through art. I strive to do so today. I find inspiration through my sons, music, my emotions, even the way the sun shines through the leaves or the way the wind sounds as I drive home from work with my window down. I hope through my art I can make others feel the same inspiration that I do every day, even with the little things.”


Sunnyshore Studio: What do you like most about Christmas and the winter holiday? 

Kourtnie: Oh, I would have to say that my absolute favorite thing is the lights of the holidays. The colors meshing together. The decorations of the christmas tree and the way the ornaments and lights are placed. It might be silly but christmas is just so stunning to me.


Sunnyshore: What were traditions your family had over Christmas/winter holidays? 

Kourtnie: I have many that I remember but as I age they change. I remember leaving out cookies at my grandma Cheryl’s house. And sleeping in the living room to catch Santa, but never did. I remember going to leavenworth with my dad and now it’s a yearly thing with my sons and my fiance’s daughters. I think viewing Leavenworth in all its glory is a special kind of memory to have and I hope to continue it throughout the years.

 

Christmas on Camano

  • Saturdays, December 7 and 14, 10am-5pm
  • Caroling at 10am and 2pm
  • Free Cinnamon Rolls
  • Lots of art by local artists
  • Miniatures and More


Meet Amy Martin

We are thrilled to have Amy Martin in our Christmas show again this year (for information, see below). Besides being a terrific artist, Amy is also a veteran and a bad@!! Black Hawk aviator.

In a quiet town in the snow belt, a bit south of Lake Erie in Pennsylvania, I grew up playing baseball, building forts in the woods, playing Atari, and riding my bike to the community pool. When I was fourteen, I bought a Terry Gambit road bike and spent the summer riding miles into the countryside where I hid my bike between corn rows and hiked through fields with a backpack filled with paints and an easel. I spent my days painting landscapes, then strapped the wet oil painting to my backpack to ride home for dinner.  I read Dear Theo that summer, Vincent Van Gogh’s letters to his brother. The descriptions of his paintings filled most every page and influenced my vision of the natural world and the ways I painted it. I began to focus on using color to depict how I felt about the world around me rather than just what I saw.

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My love of reading, writing, and painting has always been fused. I graduated from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania with a BA in Creative Writing and a minor in Painting in 1995. My oil and acrylic paintings are of the natural world and are often created plein air as they were when I was younger.  I sometimes take my old canvases and paint over them while leaving pieces of the original work in view. A lake might become a cup of tea resting on a picnic blanket; a red clay desert floor flipped might become a new sky. 

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After college, I worked as a house painter for a construction company in Eugene, OR–– putting my skills with paint and brush to work to pay the rent after moving cross-country. I worked alongside and learned painting techniques from their head painter who was also an accomplished artist painter.  I found a housemate from an ad in the Eugene library who was a student painter at the University and we covered our living room in brown butcher paper to protect the carpet and spent our evenings easel-to-easel painting together. We have been lifelong friends made through art.

I also worked as a cook in Montana, Utah, and in remote sport-fishing camps in Alaska to experience new adventures, to write, and to find new landscapes to paint. It was in Alaska, flying low in bush planes over iridescent landscapes that I often sketched out the world for later paintings. I kept copious journals filled with writings and sketches of fish and water.  

Alaska is where I also gained an affinity for flying. I won a scholarship from Women in Aviation and Cessna and earned my Private Pilot Fixed Wing Rating in 2000.  After three years paying the bills as an anti-piracy specialist for Microsoft, I made a snap decision to join the Army to become a helicopter pilot. But the recruiters said they didn’t want to waste their time on me. The flight program was tough to get into and I was too old (almost 29), too small (5’2”), and too “female.” Obviously—that left me no choice but to drop everything and force my way in. I went over their heads, did my own paperwork and was accepted into the Army’s Warrant Officer Flight Program in 2002 and graduated from flight school the next year as a UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter Pilot. I flew air assault and V.I.P. missions in South Korea and served as a medevac pilot in Fairbanks, AK where we flew rescue missions to save civilians. During my two years in Korea, I often painted both the Seoul cityscape as well as their patchwork farm fields and flowers. In Alaska, I loved to fly low and gaze at the vibrant mixture of colors of the world and never grew tired of the tangled rivers that unfolded below me. My aerial paintings are a result of those hours spent looking down and out. 

I met my partner Steve while flying together in Korea and we had our daughter Margo in 2008 after which I served out my remaining year stationed at Ft. Lewis in WA. Then, I took employment with Boeing in Supplier Management on the KC-46 Tanker Program and later, the 777X. In June 2016, I left Boeing to use my GI Bill and earn an MFA in Creative Writing at Goddard College (Port Townsend, WA, 2019). I now work as a painter and freelance writer from my home office and studio on Camano Island. I spent the last few years writing (and rewriting) a flight memoir. If you’d like to get on the waitlist for my book (and also see more of my art)—follow the link to my website: 

My experiences flying, living, and working outdoors have been great influences on my both my writing and painting.  I seek to bring those perspectives to my art.

Christmas on Camano

  • Saturdays, December 7 & 14
  • 10am-5pm
  • Caroling at 10am and 2pm

Learn more about our Christmas show here:

Laurie Laun

Meet Laurie Laun, one of the local artists in Sunnyshore Studio’s upcoming Christmas on Camano show that opens Saturday, December 7.

Laurie has practiced art throughout her life, including early study at the Chicago Art Institute.  While raising her family and earning several college degrees including an MBA, she served for many years as an executive at high tech companies.  In her travels to over 30 countries Laurie has become informed by many artistic cultures: she mastered batik in Java, aboriginal dot painting in Australia, mulberry paper-making in Fiji, wood engraving and block printing in Singapore and haiku poetry in Japan.  She lives on beautiful Camano Island, where she paints with a focus on exuberant color and graphic form.

Last Christmas Laurie donated her miniature collection to Jenny. Laurie was downsizing. She knew Jenny loved miniatures and was still collecting. You will see her beautiful miniatures on the windows at the Studio during the Christmas show. Thanks Laurie!

We caught up to Laurie and asked her a few questions:

Sunnyshore Studio: What is a favorite Christmas tradition?

Laurie: A favorite annual Christmas tradition in our family back in the day, starting in 1973, was for the ladies and the kids to drive around the byways of Camano Island to our favorite spots to pick wild rose hips.  Then we came back to Mom’s house and sat in front of the fire with a hot cup of eggnog.  With needle and thread, we beaded the lovely red hips on long garlands to hang up in the kitchen to dry for tea.

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Sunnyshore Studio: What is Christmas to you?

Laurie: Christmas to me, is about gathering…

Gather: to bring together into one group; to harvest; to collect one’s energies and ……. for all to say, Happy birthday to Jesus.

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Sunnyshore Studio’s Christmas show opens on Saturday, December 7, 10am-5pm, and runs through Saturday, December 14, 10am-5pm. Learn more here.

Remembering Fanny, the Matriarch of our family of artists

Today we celebrate the birthday of the matriarch of our Family of artists, Fanny Y. Cory.

Fanny was born October 18, 1887, in Waukegan, IL. She endured many hardships growing up, including the death of her mother and beloved sister, Agnes, from tuberculosis. By her late teens and early twenties she had become one of the leading illustrators in New York City, a profession dominated by men.

She married a Montana cowboy, Fred Cooney. Fred and Fanny raised their three children on their 400 acre ranch next to Lake Sewell (Canyon Ferry Lake), close to Helena, Montana.

To put her three children through college, Fanny took up cartooning. Her daily strip “Sunnysayings”, published by King Features Syndicate in newspapers throughout America for 35 years, was beloved by young and old alike. Besides Sunnysayings, she also illustrated, and sometimes wrote, “Little Miss Muffet” which was King Syndicate’s answer to “Little Orphan Annie.”

You can learn more about her life as an illustrator and cartoonist here. http://montanawomenshistory.org/drawing-on-motherhood-the-cartoons-and-illustrations-of-fanny-cory-cooney/

Fanny had an incredible imagination. She was also a wonderful gardener. Those two things came together in the imaginary world of fairies. During her years in Montana she began a series of watercolor paintings of fairies which after her death was published as the “Fairy Alphabet.” She considered her Fairy Alphabet her greatest artistic achievement. Fanny painted twenty six watercolors of fairies and wrote rhymes for each letter of the alphabet. These watercolors are now stored for preservation in the archive of the Montana museum of history. They are compiled today in her popular “Fairy Alphabet.” Because of copyright, we can’t show the original illustrations. But this “Dancing Daffodil” painting was not used in the series. It shows the soft watercolor and brilliant imagination Fanny had.

In 1952, Fanny moved from her 400 acre ranch near Helena, Montana, to a small cottage on Camano Island perched on a cliff overlooking Saratoga passage and the Olympic mountains to the west. She called the beach below “Montana Beach.” Her cottage was just across the road and down a long driveway from “Sea Crest Farm”, the farm on Camano where my mother, Ann, grew up.

Fanny welcomed her beloved grandchildren into her home, including my mom, Ann. She formed the “Grunt and Groan Art Club” where each member was encouraged to paint a painting every week, and they often painted together at her cottage.

Fanny continued to paint fairies into her 80’s. Even though her eyesight was failing and hand was a little shaky, they are charming.


Fanny also painted a little watercolor every day, a scene from her window, looking out over the water.

And every day into her 80’s Fanny did pushups and sit ups and read a chapter from the Bible. At night she kissed the picture of her beloved sister Agnes that sat on her dresser.

Fanny passed away on July 28th, 1972, at her daughter Sayre’s home in Stanwood, WA. But her creative gifts, her imagination, and her zest for life live on in her family of artists and creatives.


This October, Sunnyshore Studio is celebrating the life and legacy of Fanny Y. Cory by releasing the second season of “Fairy Sightings”. This short videos were shot at the home of Betty Dorotik, just a few hundred feet south of the cottage where Fanny lived. Here’s one of those videos from Season Two:

If you’d like to learn more about Fanny’s story you can check out this documentary I made in 2017.


My son, Julian and I, spent a couple days of vacation in Montana. Visiting the sights and shooting footage. His middle name is “Cory” named after his famous great-great-grandmother Fanny Y. Cory.

Eric Locke’s big musical contribution to the We Are Family documentary

By Jason Dorsey

The We are Family documentary that tells the story of an inner city basketball team that won the Indiana basketball championship against all odds took a big step forward musically thanks to the generous contribution of my friend, Eric Locke. Here’s that story.

A couple of weeks ago I realized that our feature documentary, which is about 2.5 hours long having been cut down from over five hours, still has a lot of musical holes. Through the funds raised by the Kickstarter campaign, I had been able to pay a lot of gifted musicians for their original compositions.

But I was out of money and we we had musical holes to fill. So I reached out to some of my musician friends, including Eric. Months before, I had connected Eric to David to see if any of his music might be a fit. But I hadn’t heard back from David so I figured I would ask again. Eric sent David a link to his music on YouTube and David wrote back.

“…The thing is, his stuff is GREAT.  He’s got a positive vibe running through, and generally the right kind of high energy levels we would need for game footage, but also in some cases under the talking heads, to give those some energy.”

Here’s an example of one of Eric’s songs.

Eric graciously gave David and I permission to use his music for free, as a gift! This generous gift will allow us to fill musical holes, and it is another great example of how this has been a community project. I could not do it without friends like Eric who have stood with me.

Here’s a short interview I did with Eric.

Jason: Eric when did you first hear about the We are Family project?

Eric: Hmm…I probably first heard you talking about the project here and
there while getting to know you in the past couple of years before
getting a fuller appreciation of it when the Go Fund Me campaign went
live.

Jason: Months ago you agreed to let us use your music for the film (thanks so much!). But then you didn’t hear back from us. What were you thinking in those “silent” months?

Eric: I enjoyed and appreciated the interest but didn’t dwell on it much after doing my part as advice from wiser people (and personal experience) has taught me that it’s best to approach opportunities often but lightly.

Jason: Tell me about yourself as a musician.

Eric: I got my first guitar at 14, was in a few bands here and there while
growing up. In the late 90’s when digital recording for the masses was opening up the Mrs, (Stephanie) let us get some recording gear and I was able to start learning how to record to try and get these melodies and ideas out of my head. While I work primarily in fits and starts I’m grateful to realize at least some of the ideas and concepts that get stuck in my mind. I feel fortunate to live in a time where technology can allow an individual to
do that.

Jason: What were early musical influences in your life? Inspirations?

Eric: The earliest were probably movie soundtracks. My dad would have music from soundtracks and artists of the day playing through the house while he was cooking or some such. My sister and I would go skating at the
local skating rink almost every weekend so we were exposed heavily to
pop music of the day there. Rock, soul, etc. When I got into electric guitar it was an unexpected trip into heavier music due to a friend I had. One moment I’m trying to learn a Michael Jackson song and the next my friend is tossing it across the room and “forcing” me to learn Heavy Metal. I don’t think I’d be into composing music now if it wasn’t for that but I was a little chapped at the time as I had a pretty low appreciation of Metal.

Jason: Did you have training as a musician or are you self-trained?

Eric: Self taught though the thought of taking time out for training is very
inviting nowadays.

Jason: Have you been a part of bands?

Eric: Yes I have and I’ve met some truly wonderful people as well as having
some good formative experiences. I don’t know that I’m a good “band”
member in that I don’t do well improvising and I really lean towards a
singular vision but everybody I’ve ever worked with has been good sports
in letting me participate and maybe one day I’ll hit a tipping point and
“get it”.

Jason: Talk to me about your compositions. What is your style? What are you trying to do with your sound?

Eric: I really enjoy a wall of ethereal sound. The Mrs, (who has a beautiful
voice) has been kind enough to work with me and I’m really content with
what has come from the collaboration so far. I’m enjoying her soft voice
over heavier ethereal music. We worked up a version of The Mighty Power of God, music by Phil Peterson, (Grammy Nominated) who is an old Chief Musician of Grace Church Seattle and I couldn’t be happier with the sound and style achieved there and other compositions since then performed by The Undone Orchestra. We’ve hit a stride that I’m really content with and I look forward to exploring more of that style in the future.

Jason: What was it like after the months of silence to hear back from
David Lichty that your music would be a perfect fit for the documentary?

Eric: It was a true highlight for myself. I felt like I got a small taste of
the glory that these young men, their families, coaches and community
had all worked for.

Jason: Any last thoughts?

Eric: I’m looking forward to seeing the entirety of the We Are Family story,
how my music folds in and a big “Thank You!” to all for letting me
participate. All the Best!

Acrylic University welcomes its first Access to Art Students!

Acrylic University’s welcomes three students to its first Access to Art program, November 1, 2019. Grants of $350 for each student were raised through Jed’s recent Radiant Landscape show, and from the generous gifts of a few supporters of this program.

Access to Art is a two year program that provides quality art instruction, art supplies and a nurturing art community to youth ages 13-22 who apply, and are accepted, into the program. Each youth who applies is required to have an advocate who will be there to support and encourage them.

You can learn more about the program here.

Director of Acrylic University, Jed Dorsey, is passionate about this program. Learn the story behind Jed’s passion here.

https://www.acrylicuniversity.com/blog/art-access-program-helping-young-people-thrive-creatively

We are so excited to have Cajun-Rain, Kristen, and Marley on the Access to Art journey.

Here’s an interview with one of our students from this summer sharing what this program would mean to her.

If you are interested in giving a grant, or partial grant, to provide access to an artistically gifted, low-income youth, please contact Jason Dorsey: j.dorsey23@gmail.com.

The “Friendship Sign”

I call our new sign the “friendship sign.” Here’s why.

From left to right: Jed Dorsey, Jacob Swearingen, Jason Dorsey, Jenny Wallace Dorsey

In 2015, I sketched out a basic design idea for a roadside sign for Sunnyshore Studio. I asked my dear friend from Stanwood High School, Jacob Swearingen, to see if he would work his magic to create it. He said Yes.

This is my original idea.

Jacob’s concept has become the Sunnyshore Studio brand.

I tell the story of that first sign here.

I finished that post with these words. “I drove home with the sign, but with so much more than a sign. For the sign is a symbol of friendship over the years, of love and loyalty and past memories and the hopes of many new memories and many decades more of friendship.”

Jacob’s sign was to large for us to put along the road. It fits perfectly at the entrance of the studio.

So I still needed an outdoor sign that would go along the road. I looked into a few options. A plastic sign just wasn’t cutting it for the kind of substantial sign I wanted, and it wasn’t personal enough. I couldn’t afford a metal sign at the time. Then one day, my friend Wade Starkenberg posted on facebook a metal sign he had made. It was beautiful. I immediately reached out to him to see if he would make one for Sunnyshore Studio.

Wade and I grew up in the same circles. We went to school in Stanwood and church at Camano Chapel. I spent July 2014 at my parent’s home on Camano Island putting the concepts of Identity Mapping into book form and also spent time with old friends, including Wade who I had reconnected with on facebook. I spent the afternoon at his home on Big Lake, met his wife, Jennifer and two sons. His mom, Yvonne, joined us for a delicious Salmon dinner. Decades had passed since we had last seen each other. But it seemed like just a few days. It was great to catch up.

Wade had been supportive of our Sunnyshore Studio project and graciously agreed to be a sponsor of Jed’s 2017 show “There and Back Again. https://sunnyshorestudio.com/tag/there-and-back-again/. So I was hopeful that he might make the sign. He said, “Yes.” When I asked him what it would cost me, he said “Nothing!”

Wade cut a few signs to get it just right. He had to program the design and lettering into a computer that operates the machine that cuts the metal. I liked the look of the steel sign and so Wade cut me an extra. I can take it with me on trips. I love that the Sunnyshore Studio brand is now portable. Different backdrops give it a different feel. Here are some examples.

Jackie and I spent a morning this summer filming the sunrise coming up behind the sign. My son Jacob used that footage to create an animated brand. Currently sonic branding is being made for the animation to Todd Masten, a neighbor I met I met at my coffee shop in Redmond, River Trail.

So you can understand why I was excited on Wednesday of this week to pick up the finished outdoor sign from Wade.

I spent a couple hours on Wednesday creating a base for the sign from driftwood I had collected from Randy and Melanie Serroel’s home at Port Susan Terrace, just north of Sunnyshore.

I needed a curved piece of driftwood to hang the sign on. So I called Melanie and she said “come on down.” Melanie and I walked the beach and spotted a perfect piece of driftwood.

Dad helped me start assembling the sign. I had a Camano Art Association meeting though and had to leave. He said that he would finish the sign up. He spent yesterday assembling the sign. Mom took photographs.

The new outdoor sign is up, just in time for Jed’s “Radiant Landscape” show that opens on Saturday. I love it!

I call it a friendship sign because it was birthed and forged and built in friendship. The friendships stretch all the way back to high school classmates Jacob and Wade, to neighbors Melanie and Randy, to my kids Jackie and Jacob and new friend Todd, to Dad and Mom. It’s not just about past friendships though. I know that the sign will direct many people to our Studio where new friendships will be built.

That’s why I call it our “friendship sign.”

Fairy Sightings: Season Two launches

The highly anticipated Season Two of Fairy Sightings is here. Fairy Sightings honors the life and legacy of Fairy Master, Fanny Y Cory, matriarch of the Dorsey family of artists. Fanny painted and wrote a delightful fairy alphabet that still charms children, their parents and grandparents today.

A painting of a Fairy by Fanny in her 80’s

Fanny taught her granddaughter, Ann Cory Dorsey, to spot fairies in flowers. In this episode, Jason Dorsey, who is on a quest to spot fairies, visits, with his mother Ann, the garden of another Fairy Master, Betty Dorotik. Enjoy their walk through Betty’s garden and learn the lore of the fairies. You may even spot one, or two!

Fairy Sightings – Episode Two: The quest to spot a fairy at the garden of
Fairy Master Betty Dorotik

Season Two

If you missed any of Season One Fairy Sighting episodes you can catch up on them here. Microwave some popcorn, scoop a bowl of ice-cream, settle in for binge watching, and let the magic begin.

Fairy Sightings – Fairy Houses
Fairy Sightings – Introducing Fairy Mystery Boxes
Fairy Sightings – Fanny Y Cory’s Fairy Alphabet
Fairy Sightings – First Fairy Sighting
Fairy Sightings – Fairy Master Ann Cory, My Mom, won’t tell
Fairy Sightings – Fairy Friendly Environment
Fairy Sightings – Jason Discover’s a Fairy Circle
Fairy Sightings – Jason sees fairies dancing at night
Fairy Sightings – Willow’s Discovery
Fairy Sightings – The Treasure in the Fairy Chest

Cindy and Steve Sundberg – Patrons of Art

With my brother Jed Dorsey’s upcoming show “Radiant Landscapes” opening next Saturday, October 5th, and the Camano Art Association’s first annual group show and launch of our new Patron’s Program the first weekend of November, I’m thinking these days about the importance of friends, collectors and patrons of art.

Steve and Cindy

I interviewed Cindy Sundberg to get her perspective on being an art patron. Cindy’s mom Vicki was a classmate with my mom (Stanwood High School class of 1964) and Cindy was a SHS classmate of my sister April. Cindy and her husband Steve have bought paintings of Jed and my mom at Sunnyshore. They are the first to sign up as part of CAA’s Patron’s Program.

Jason: Tell us a little bit about yourself?

Cindy: Steve and I were born and raised in the Stanwood/Camano community and both graduated from Stanwood High School. Our families have been a part of the S/C area for several generations. We moved to the Tri Cities in 1998 when Steve accepted a management position at the (then) newly-built Twin City Foods processing facility in Pasco. I had the good fortune of landing a position at Sigma Financial Group in Kennewick and have enjoyed 21 years with the company.  While I continue to work, Steve retired last year and stays busier than ever at home with a seemingly-endless “honey do” list and now our six-month old Saint Bernard, Knut. We still refer to Stanwood/Camano as “home” and return often to see family and friends.

Jason: What started you buying art, especially the art of local artists?

Cindy: Steve and I began buying more meaningful art, not necessarily local art, when we started traveling a little.  I think our first real painting was purchased in San José del Cabo shortly after we were married. Rather than haul home a bunch of trinkets to mark the trip, Steve suggested we buy one piece of art for our house that we could enjoy for years to come and remember our travels. (I think I still hauled home trinkets, but Steve was right!)  On a local level, our eyes were opened to all the amazing artists in the Stanwood/Camano area when we came home one weekend and stopped in at “Art By the Bay” up at the fairgrounds. Walking around looking at all the incredible artwork created locally sort of “clicked” for us and reinforced our desire to decorate our home with artwork that has meaning.

A wall of art in the Sundberg home

Jason: What is meaningful in having a connection to the artists/and/or the places they paint?

Cindy: There’s something comforting and joyful about knowing the story behind a particular painting or having a connection to the artist.  Paintings purchased while traveling are fun reminders of adventures, while pieces created by Stanwood/Camano artists can bring comfort and beautiful reminders of where we both grew up. Southeastern Washington is not devoid of art either and we’ve found some neat things here as well.  We don’t get that sort of “back story” or emotional attachment from ready-to-go art from box stores.

Steve and Cindy purchased an Ann Dorsey original at the May 2016 Studio Tour while Sunnyshore Studio was still being finished!

Jason: Why did you sign up for the CAA Patron’s Program?

Cindy: The Dorsey family and their mission to give back to the local art community is inspiring.  The Patron’s Program is a great way for non-artists to show support for the wonderful things happening on the Island and around Stanwood. And with several levels of support to choose from, the Patron’s Program is affordable for any art admirer.

Jason: What would you share with other “emerging patron’s” about the value of collecting art and supporting CAA’s colony of artists?

Cindy: Don’t hesitate to get started. If you’re unsure how to begin, start with simply catching an art tour or following social media to familiarize yourself with artists and their styles. The studio tours in May and “Art By the Bay” are incredible opportunities to see what’s happening in the area. The CAA talent is unbelievable and it costs nothing to appreciate it.  Don’t be afraid to ask questions, talk to the artists, and just look around. It’s an ongoing learning experience. At some point, you’ll find “the one” and be ready to make that first purchase and you won’t regret it (you will regret the painting you didn’t buy when you return for it and it’s sold!).  

It’s a lot of fun to have someone ask about a painting in our home and we can give them a quick story about the artist or the location. For example, we have a really lovely painting in our dining room by Ann Cory.  How cool is it that I (Cindy) can say that Ann Cory Dodgson/Dorsey went to school with my Mom, I went to grade school with her daughter April, and the family has an incredible studio where we grew up?  Or that the couple John Ebner pieces in our living room are from this amazing guy who has a spectacular studio/gardens on Camano and you can see his studio and more each May when the island comes alive for the art tour?   It’s a real source of pride and a positive identity for the S/C community. Who wouldn’t want to support it?

Interested in joining the Camano Arts Association (CAA) Patron’s Program. Contact Jason Dorsey (317.209.6768). Join us for the launch of the Patron’s Program on Friday, November 1st. Ticket required.

Want to purchase local art? Shop at Jed Dorsey’s “Radiant Landscape” show at Sunnyshore Studio’s bricks and mortar or online gallery (October 5th-12). And at the Camano Art Association’s Premier Collection Show featuring 40+ local artists November 1-2 at the Camano Center.

 

Introducing AU’s ACCESS TO ART Students

Acrylic University is thrilled to introduce the first students in our Access to Art program. These three young women applied and have been accepted into the two-year Access to Art program.

The goal of the Access to Art program is to provide artistically gifted students with access to (1) high quality art instruction, (2) art supplies and (3) a supportive art community. All youth ages 13-22 are welcome to apply. We hope to provide access to many low-income youth over the years to come. We are thrilled to welcome the following young women:

Cajun-Rain

My name is Cajun-Rain. I’m fifteen years old. I live in Warm Springs, Oregon.

My interest in art began when my sister introduced me to art a year ago. One of the hard things I struggle with in creating is making something unique. This art program will help me create and explore my art and grow as an artist.

Anna Ronning

Hi! My name is Kristen Ronning. I am 15 years old and I live in Stanwood, Washington.

I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t interested in art. As soon as I could express myself, it was concentrated through creating art. My interest grew through my parents’ encouragement and simple practice. I’ve been focused mainly on sketching female faces, as that’s what has come easiest to me, but I’m eager to expand the ways that I create. It is hard for me to work with mediums other than a pencil and paper, but that’s what I’m hoping to figure out! The struggle I face is my own perfectionism and self-doubt, a relatively busy schedule (for a 15-year-old), and a lack of knowledge and education on painting, an art form I’ve wanted to, but never quite grasped. “Access to Art” would greatly help me by introducing me to new ways I can be imaginative and creative and teaching me the techniques I can use, so I can grow and be confident in my art!

Marley Raunig

My name is Marley Raunig. I’m thirteen years old and I live in Seattle, WA.

I started painting with acrylic paints last summer. The hardest part about painting is I have a lot of ideas and not enough time to paint. This program will help me to learn more about painting techniques.

10% of the sales from Jed Dorsey’s upcoming Radiant Landscapes show is going to fund these students.

You can support the Access to Art students by purchasing a painting on our online gallery, or by a monetary gift. If you would like to help support an Access to Art Student please contact Jason Dorsey: j.dorsey23@gmail.com.

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