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Stop by and welcome Jed home

Lot’s of excitement at Sunnyshore Studio with the Camano Island Studio Tour opening tomorrow, 10:00am.

The excitement started on Monday, April 30th when Jed, Renae and Willow left Indianapolis to move to the Seattle area. They had lots of adventures as they traveled across the country including staying at a beautiful lodge in South Dakota. Jed is going to paint a commission for its owner.  They spent time at a wonderful water park hotel in Missoula, and hiked to the top of a hill that looks over the city.

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They had lots of others adventures. To many to tell now. Here are a few pictures.

Jed, Renae and Willow stopped for dinner (Zeeks Pizza) at our apartment in Redmond on their way to Camano Island. It was lots of fun for us to see them, and wonderful to have them close!

On Thursday we dropped the Adminstrator of Sunnyshore Studio, Jenny Dorsey, off at the airport. She is going back to be with our oldest son, Jacob, who is graduating from Purdue University. I’ll be joining them in West Lafayette on Saturday.

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Jed has worked hard building a “Gallery Annex” for his artwork at Sunnyshore Studio. It looks great.

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Jed has been hard at work painting so that he will have artwork to fill it up.

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Of course, his paintings are beautiful as always!

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Jackie helped me prepare the parking area behind the studio. It’s looking great thanks to Dad mowing the grass!

All the paintings are hung, and there is a calm tonight before the storm of visitors that will come tomorrow.  We expect over 1,000 guests over the first weekend!

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Will you be one of those that stops by. I hope so.

And when you do, welcome Jed, Renae and Willow home.

20th Annual Studio Tour Guest Artist: Amanda Pearson

Sunnyshore Studio is thrilled to have the fabulous Amanda Pearson as one of our guest artist for the 20th Annual Camano Island Studio Tour.  Mark Your Calendars for the 20th Anniversary Camano Island Mother’s Day Studio Tour this May Amanda comes all the way from St. Paul, MN and we think you’ll love the colorful, playful and detailed artwork of this emerging artist.

Sunnyshore Studio: Tell us about yourself:

Amanda: I currently live in Richfield, MN (just south of Minneapolis). I grew up in Portland, OR and moved out to the Twin Cities for college. But now I’m married and bought a house, so I’ll be here for a while even though the Pacific Northwest will always be my home. My husband is fantastic and is always supportive of whatever schemes I get us into. We have two cats and they are rambunctious and endlessly entertaining, although they do not appreciate when I spend more time on my art projects than hanging out with them.

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Sunnyshore Studio: How did you get started in art?

Amanda: I was an “artistic” kid. My childhood was spent making various doodads. I remember making a VHS player and videotape out of paper, and a briefcase out of a box that I took to school instead of a backpack (I was super cool). When I was waiting for my parents to be done talking to people after church on Sunday mornings, I would take the weekly bulletins and make little furniture or miniature scenes out of them.

In 3rd and 4th grade, I made a name for myself in my elementary school for making the best dioramas. Then in junior high and high school, my art classes were the best parts of my days (I always took as many as I could). I look back on the projects that I did in those days, and even in my freshman year of high school I was gluing sand or sugar or baking soda to fulfill whatever the assignment was. My mom “fondly” remembers all of the urgent trips to Michaels or the art store to try to make it before they closed on Sunday because of a last-minute scramble to finish something before it was due on Monday. In college, I majored in art education and graduated with my Bachelors in Visual Arts Education K-12. While my actual occupation is currently not art-related, I’ve found ways in my adulthood to incorporate art – I’ve taught elementary kids in an after-school art program, and taken community education art classes to keep me in this back in the days when I didn’t have the space or time to dedicate to it that I do now.

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Sunnyshore Studio: What has been your journey as an artist?

Amanda: It took me a little while to figure out how to incorporate art into my life after graduating. I had my art education degree, but wasn’t convinced I wanted to work as a teacher in a school. I spent a couple of years working retail and in a coffee shop, and then I secured a corporate job in the mortgage industry. Cubicles are not conducive to creativity. I did make sure to work in times to still create – since I was working a lot of hours and didn’t have a dedicated art space in my rented rooms/apartments, I decided that I would take a community education introduction to painting class. I enrolled over and over again, not because I wanted to learn the color wheel REALLY well, but because I could sit in the back and just paint. That way, there were a few hours a week where I had to make something. Painting has never been my favorite thing, but doing this enabled me to keep art a part of my life even when I had so many excuses for it to fall by the wayside. Each session, the other people taking the class were mostly empty-nesters or others who had the same tale of enjoying art when they were younger but with jobs and families and all the obligations that come with those, hadn’t made anything in 20+ years and wanted to go back to that part of who they were. I didn’t want that to be my story, but I could see how easily that could happen. So I kept taking the classes. Eventually with my corporate job, I was able to work less than 60 hours a week and had more time to do what I wanted.

Over the last few years, I started to move away from the once-a-week painting sessions and focused on the gluing projects. The reason was very practical at first – I wanted to make stuff but didn’t have the space, so I focused on methods that were portable. That way, I could go and work in Starbucks instead of being stuck in my apartment. So that’s what I would do! I would put whatever project I had in a pillow case and bring my Elmer’s glue bottle and bag of string and make my way to the nearest coffee place. It was not the most efficient way of doing projects that were already incredibly time-consuming, but I was able to finish one or two a year this way. I didn’t show them much, but joined a local art center and participated in their semi-annual member shows (and won a blue ribbon on one of my pieces). Then, my husband and I bought a house. It was a nerve-racking experience. I had gone into it with space for an art studio on my “please please have” list, but after our 5th rejected offer and skyrocketing housing prices, I thought I would have to sacrifice this (and my must-have of a second bathroom). But! We found our house! With a room on the main floor that made a perfect art studio. With my pieces, time is the biggest factor. Being able to have a spot where I could go to every day, even if I had only a few minutes, has made it possible for me to be much more productive and pour myself into this piece of what I do.

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I also needed to find my niche. Like I mentioned, painting is not a creative outlet that drives me. I also don’t have much patience for drawing. So what would I do? What would be my thing? What would be the way that I would express my ideas and views on the world? It came to me one night – at the time I didn’t realize it would be such a turning point, but it ended up changing everything. It was a Saturday night. I knew that I wanted my next project to be of Oneonta Falls in Oregon, but I didn’t want to paint it. Then it hit me – I wanted to glue embroidery floss instead. Well, I didn’t have that material at the time, and it was 10 o’clock on a Saturday night and I absolutely HAD to start and could not wait. So I went to Wal-Mart and bought some embroidery floss from their limited assortment and some little scissors, found some cardboard, and went to work. I was so proud of it, and I still am. Looking at it now, I can see a lot of flaws and things that I have learned with the medium since then, but I still am inspired by that moment and what came from it. It returned me to my instincts and tapped into what has driven me to “make” since I was a kid.

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Sunnyshore Studio: What about your future as an artist?

Amanda: Since I have now amassed a decent-sized portfolio, I am transitioning away from just making projects for myself to put on my walls for my own personal gallery. At this point, I am trying to find ways to share what I’ve made with others, through displaying art in public places that host artists, selling prints and smaller pieces at art shows, and participating in group shows at galleries such as this one. It is overwhelming at times and I am learning a lot. It is also scary – I am used to critiques from all of the art classes I have taken, but these pieces were made for personal reasons, and I’m putting them out there for strangers to have an opinion on. I have gotten a lot of very positive feedback and some good pointers as well, and I hope to keep learning and pushing myself to be better and share my work with others.

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Sunnyshore Studio: Why are you excited to participate in the 2018 – 20th annual! – Camano Island  Studio Tour at Sunnyshore Studio?

Amanda: The studio is an amazing place. Jason is my father’s cousin and my father grew up in the area, and this is a really special way to be connected even though I live so far away. It is an honor to have been asked to participate. There is something so special about an area coming together in a creative endeavor like an open art studio tour. The Dorsey’s and other artists who are showing at the studio are fantastic and their work is beautiful, so I am so excited for this opportunity to display along with them.

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Sharing Sunnyshore Studio with Grandpa Ron and Grandma Grace for the first time

The mission of Sunnyshore Studio is to share the beauty of Camano with the world. But it took a full year before Grandpa Ron, and Grandma Grace, the parents of Jenny Dorsey to stay at the studio after work on it had been completed in December 2016.

It was especially exciting because they arrived in Stanwood in glorious fashion: on the train! Jenny and Jackie were on pins and needles as the train pulled in on Tuesday, December 26th.

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We hauled Ron and Grace’s bags to our car and drove out to the Studio.

It was so special to drive up to the Studio with the Christmas lights all aglow.

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Ron and Grace were so enthusiastic about seeing the Studio and our kids were happy to be able to share it with them. And so we camped out the next four days together, enjoying the beauty of Camano, and most importantly, being together.

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Our Top Ten List of Thanks

It’s been almost a year since Sunnyshore Studio’s Grand Opening on December 2nd, 2016. Here’s our “Top Ten” list of thanks as we look back over this past year.

10. We are thankful for the five art shows we have been able to host over the past year, our sponsors who have made those shows possible, and the thousands who have stopped by to view them. 

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9. We are thankful for the opportunity to do creative work beyond just art. We’ve been able to publish three book and make one documentary! 

 

8. We are thankful that the Studio is becoming a place where we can encourage, mentor and train other artists. 

 

7. We are thankful for the Colony of Artists on Camano Island who support, encourage, and help each other in so many ways. 

 

6. We are thankful for the many friends who have stopped by to visit with us. We love sharing our Studio and Camano Island with you. 

 

5. We are thankful for this beautiful place that we call “home”, Camano Island.

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4. We are thankful that this decades old dream of building an art studio to showcase our family’s art legacy has come true. 

 

 

 

3. We are thankful to our friends, collectors and patrons who have supported our family of artists since 1969.

2. We are thankful for our family and the opportunity  to work together as a family to do art and to share beauty with the world.

 

1.  Finally, we are thankful to God our Creator and Sustainer and Redeemer whose beauty, love and grace inspires all we do.

Happy Thanksgiving From Sunnyshore

 

 

 

Fun opening weekend for second annual Dorsey Family Christmas Show

We had a fun opening weekend Sunnyshore Studio’s Dorsey Family second annual Christmas show, “Christmas on Camano.” Here are some of the highlights.

My brother Jed and I cut down our Christmas tree. Our plan is to “home grow” the Studio’s tree each year!

Jenny decorated it beautifully.

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And, as she always does, mom made the space so beautiful with her gift of decorating and all the pretty things she has.

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On Friday night Jenny led the “unveiling” of my  Dad’s annual Christmas painting and cards.

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It’s a lovely scene from the Cedarhome area.

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There was art from every family member. Fairie’s by Fanny Y. Cory.

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Watercolors by Jack Dorsey.

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Ann Dorsey had her bright acrylic paintings on display, as well as her new Camano Island poster!

The siblings all had paintings too. Jason’s watercolors.

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April’s acrylics and mixed media.

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And Jed’s acrylics.

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Jed had top sales for the opening (no surprise there!), which we were all very happy at as he makes his living as an artist. He has quite a fan base in Washington, and his art is prized by collectors.

Jed painted live on Saturday, and it was impressive to watch his painting take shape.

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The finished product is really quite impressive. I can’t show it here. But it will be for sale on Saturday for a mere 900$.

Most special was seeing friends and artist colleagues from Camano. We are trying to build community through art, and it’s awesome to see that happening.

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We’ll be open the follow five Saturdays from 10:00am-5:00pm. We’d love it if you would stop by, view the art, shop for gifts for friends and family, and enjoy one of Mom’s cinnamon rolls.

 

I was able to attend one day of Jed Dorsey’s October workshop

I was able to attend the first day of Jed Dorsey’s October workshop at Sunnyshore Studio that took place Wednesday through Saturday of last week. Jed started off the day with a mini-lecture on what it takes to make a good artist: (1) desire, (2) opportunity, (3) encouragement, and (4) practice.

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Jed is an engaging and encouraging speaker. I was struck by one of the goals for the workshop that he shared. He said that one of his goals was that people would feel loved as persons, not just for their artistic performance. I thought this was great because deep down we all want to be valued not for what we do but who we are.

I sensed that the workshop participants did feel loved.

It was fun to hang out with my dad and my sister, April, who both participated in the workshop.

Having Dad in a workshop is like having a second instructor because he spends a lot of his time going around and chatting, sharing tips, critiques, etc.

Jed demonstrated throughout the day. You always learn a lot by watching another artist paint. And he’s pretty good.

Everyone worked hard on their art paintings throughout the day.

And ended up with some great paintings!

Plus we had time together to visit and just be in community.

All in all it was a great workshop…We’re already planning for another Jed Dorsey workshop in October.

Here’s a fun little video I made up of our time together. Enjoy.

Release Announcement of Queen of Montana Beach: the story of artist Fanny Y. Cory.

Sunnyshore Studio announces the release of Toni McCarty’s biography of artist Fanny Y. Cory, Queen of Montana Beach.

In this fast-paced, engaging, captivating biography you will discover Fanny Y. Cory, one of the top illustrators and cartoonists in the twentieth century. You will watch her overcome great sadness and bring smiles to people across America. There is something in this book for everyone! Artists will be inspired by her artistic career, motivated by the desire to provide for her family. History buffs will enjoy snapshots of New York City at the turn of the century, life on a ranch in Montana during the years of the Great Depression, and life on Camano Island in the 1950’s and 60’s. And people who love children will be delighted at a woman who captured them in all of their innocence and whimsy.

You can purchase a copy at our Studio or our online store: https://sunnyshorestudio.com/store/Queen-of-Montana-Beach-The-Story-of-Artist-Fanny-Y-Cory-p93479315

 

 

The Grunt and Groan Art Club

I personally don’t remember not having my wonderful Grandma Meetsy  (Grandma Meetsy = nationally known illustrator, comic strip artist, Fanny Y. Cory) living across the road and down a lane from our Camano Island farm home.   I was the youngest of her daughter, Sayre’s, four children.

Dr. D, Bob Cooney, Mar D, Carol, FYC, Bud, Rob, Ted, Kay, Jean, Ann

Family picture with Fanny’s daughter, Sayre Dodgson’s, and son, Bob Cooney’s, and their children at the Dodgson farm on Camano Island. Ann Cory Dorsey is the little girl in the white dress, bottom right. Margaret Day  is standing third from the left in the back row. Fanny Y. Cory is at the top, far right. 

I also don’t remember there NOT being a “Grunt and Groan Art Club” but it was something that came to be after our grandma moved near us from her Montana ranch.   I grew up with it being an important part of our lives!

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Painting of a Grunt and Groan Art Club Member fast at work by Fanny Y. Cory

My older sister, Margaret Day, recalled her memories of the club’s early days, and how it came to be,  in a letter to her granddaughter, Amanda Day.  I could not say it better and being the youngest, I do not even know all these early details – and so I will share my sister’s story.

Margaret wrote, “Whenever we went over to her (Grandma Meetsy’s) house to visit,  we would sit around the big round oak table… which looked out on a lovely view of Puget sound.  There were always watercolor sets, brushes and Strathmore board small pieces sitting out and while we visited, we’d paint the view we saw.  We’d ask each other how we were doing on the sky, tree, sound, mountains and usually the only answer would be a congenial grunt ‘um hah!’”.  Or, as Margaret continued,  “One of the artists would exclaim over a less than perfect effect with a low ‘oh no!’ groan.”

Hence came the “birth of the ‘Grunt and Groan Club’” of which she was a charter member.  Of course, Meetsy and her daughter, Sayre, were the high officers.  My brothers Bud and Robert were probably charter members too .

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A letter from Fanny Y. Cory to Margaret when she was at Nursing School in Chicago keeping her informed of the latest on the Grunt and Groan Art Club. 

However, personally as the youngest sibling, I remember worrying about painting something worthy enough to get myself into actual membership.  As I recall, I felt that I had achieved standing in the club with a piece I considered an exceptionally good art effort when I was about 12!

One thing about this art club, it was for fun.  It was not an instructional time at all.  I only remember two things about art that my Grandma ever told me all the years I knew her.  I treasure them like gold!

Some of Meetsy’s paintings during the “Grunt and Groan” sessions.

The club was resurrected many years later at my mother’s home in Stanwood.  Again young artists gathered around the same oak table.  This time it had been carefully covered with plastic tablecloths and on a certain day of the week for some months they all practiced painting with acrylic.

My mom, Sayre, now in her late 90’s was a happy observer, Margaret and I joined right into the fun one more time.  The youngsters were mainly Margaret’s grandchildren.  It ended up, some days at different times, there were maybe 9 of them who enjoyed this extra time of community art.  We older members gave some guidelines to the younger members, and we all did the proper amount of “grunting and groaning” as we attempted our great artist endeavors !

Once in a while, my husband, artist Jack Dorsey, stopped by and couldn’t resist giving an art pointer or two.  Unfortunately I can’t find photos of our larger group days together immersed in art – but did find photos of one day.

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Anyway, may the “Grunt and Groan Art Club” live on forever at least in heart, as young people are encouraged to just try their hand in this wonderful world of color, form, design, creativity called “art”.

by Ann Cory Dorsey in collaboration with Margaret Day 

 

Showcase of Fanny Y. Cory one month from today… ready or not!

One month from today we will showcase the life and cultural legacy of Fanny Y. Cory whether we are ready to do so or not. Here are a list of the jobs still to be done.

Can we do it?

Complete Fanny: The Artist who made America smile Documentary

We are creating a documentary movie that tells the story of Fanny Y. Cory titled “Fanny: The Artist who made America smile.” My son Julian and I shot footage in Montana this summer, and we interviewed the four grandchildren of Fanny. We have also collected a lot of old video and photographs. Now comes the task of weaving the footage and interviews and photos into the compelling story that Fanny’s life is.

Here’s an example of some of the raw footage that we have.

(1) footage of the old studio, bunkhouse and windmill that was moved to higher ground in 1952 when the water of Lake Sewell was raised which left the old ranch completely under water.

(2) Footage of a morning sunrise over Canyon Ferry Lake (once called Lake Sewell).

(3) Footage of our interview with Amanda, Curator of Collections at the Montana Museum, in the vault where Fanny’s original Fairy Alphabet paintings are stored.

My friend Chris Wyatt, who is a film critique and film maker has promised to provide some consulting on pulling together the final product. But there is a lot of work still to go. Can we do it?

Release of a new biography of Fanny titled, Queen of Montana Beach: the story of artist Fanny Y. Cory by Toni McCarty.

The least of our problems is picking up the 600 copies of the book on my day off, Monday, October 2nd. The much bigger job before me is arranging two book signings in the Seattle area. I’m happy to say one is nailed down in Redmond on Monday, October 16th, and will include a showing of the documentary film. Besides this there is setting up an account on Amazon as an individual seller, nailing the on-line pre-release of the book on October 1st, and all the other promotion that will help us sell all 600 copies before the end of the year.

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Preparing the Display

Because this is a showcase of the life and cultural legacy of Fanny, there is a lot of work still to be done to create a visual showcase telling her story through photographs, timelines, newspaper articles, etc. There are letters to go through, many magazine articles and newspaper clippings to present, all with the goal of telling the story of this amazing woman. Besides all of that there are 24 fairy prints to frame.

And if that was not enough…

Hanging the Show

We have to collect the art and hang the show. This is where Jenny the “collager” shines. But she will have her work cut out for her.

She will find a way to showcase the 24 paintings of the Fairy Alphabet.

Fanny Y. Cory, Daffodils

She will display the over 40 books that Fanny illustrated. She will showcase “Sonny” which was a nationally syndicated daily cartoon that ran in newspapers all over the country – and world – for 35 years,

and “Little Miss Muffet”, another syndicated cartoon that was King Syndicate’s rival to “Little Orphan Annie.”

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She will find a way to show the beautiful paintings of Fanny like this one of a rose.

Cottage Roses by FYC

She will display the many magazine covers and illustrations that Fanny’s art was featured in like these.

And also show the sweet illustrations of Fairies that Fanny made in her late years. They show Fanny’s decline eyesight and less control of the brush that came in her 80’s, but still they sparkle with her vivid imagination and love of beauty.

And if that was not all, Jenny will find a way to demonstrate many of the hundreds of paintings that Fanny did looking out her window on the southwest side of Camano Island, onto Saratoga passage and the Olympic Mountains beyond. These paintings catch the changing seasons that Fanny witnessed, and show the overflow of her creativity.

It will be in short, an incredibly rich and strikingly beautiful show.

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Those who are able to visit Sunnyshore Studio on Saturday, October 14th and October 21st, will be treated to an amazing display of creativity, beauty and imagination that was Fanny Y. Cory!

Can we pull it off? By God’s grace, I hope we can!

Praise of Toni McCarty’s Queen of Montana Beach: The story of artist Fanny Y. Cory

Toni McCarty has written a wonderful biography on the matriarch of our family of artists, Fanny Y. Cory.  Here’s some of the early feedback we’ve received for this book. Sunnyshore Studio wants to thank Trina, Kirby and Robert for their support and encouragement in this project.

Trina Robbins

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Trina Robbins (born 1938) is an American cartoonist. cartoonist. She was an early and influential participant in the underground comix movement, and one of the few female artists in the fledgling underground comix movement. Both as a cartoonist and historian, Robbins has long been involved in creating outlets for and promoting female comics artists. Among her many accomplishments she is the author of Pretty in Ink, North American Women Cartoonists, 1896-2013. You can read more about Trina in this Wikipedia article here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trina_Robbins

Trina writes this about Queen of Montana Beach: the story of artist Fanny Y. Cory

“One of a handful of early pioneering women cartoonists and illustrators, Fanny Y. Cory has remained undeservedly obscure compared to her more famous sisters like Rose O’Neill (The Kewpies) and Grace Drayton (The Campbell Kids).  She has long needed a book of her own, so that readers can finally appreciate her talent in illustration and comics, and now she finally has one.  Thank you, Toni McCarty!”

Kirby Lambert

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Kirby Lambert is a Western historian, Charlie Russell scholar, and long-time program director at the Montana Historical Society who has advanced public humanities immeasurably. In 2015, Kirby was recognized at the Governor’s Humanities Awards Ceremony with five other Montanans for their excellent work in the humanities in Montana.

Kirby wrote this about Toni McCarty’s Queen of Montana Beach.

“The Queen of Montana Beach provides a delightful look at one of the most captivating figures from Montana’s past. In the middle of the twentieth century, F. Y. Cory’s creations were beloved by cartoon-readers across the country. Today, although her fame has faded, Cory’s art and wit continue to offer engaging, humorous, and high-spirited glimpses of daily life.  McCarty provides a richly detailed, highly personal account of Cory’s life and her beguiling contributions to the art world. This book fills an important dual role of introducing Cory to contemporary readers and helping to ensure her rightful legacy for future generations.”  

Robert Dodgson

Robert Dodgson

Robert Dodgson is a grandson of Fanny Y. Cory and the President of F.Y.C. Publishers, Inc. Robert and his wife Sandra were catalysts in the forming of F.Y.C. Publishers, Inc. who were instrumental in the publication of Fanny’s exquisite A Fairy Alphabet watercolors in book form. You can read more about that here HISTORY OF F.Y. CORY PUBLISHERS, INC. By Sandra and Robert Dodgson, August 1st, 2017   Robert has also unofficially served as a family historian, recording videos and audio recordings of Fanny Y. Cory and others to tell the story of her life.

Robert Dodgson has this to say about Toni McCarty’s Queen of Montana Beach: The story of artist Fanny Y. Cory. 

Fanny Y. Cory’s life was an incredible testimony to what can be done when you refuse to accept your limitations. She had the rare gift of bringing humor out of misfortune and joy out of the shadows. Toni McCarty has exquisitely captured the essence of this loving, resourceful and humble pioneer woman and the world in which she lived. Thank you Toni for your dedication and skill in bringing this inspiring story to life.”

Book cover finished

We are also happy to announce that the cover of the book is now completed. Thanks to everyone who provide Sunnyshore Studio Artistic Director Jason Dorsey with so much great feedback. We were able to get all the above blurbs on the back cover and it looks great!

Queen of Montana Beach: The story of artist Fanny Y. Cory  is due to be released Saturday, October 14th.

Queen Cover - FINAL

 

 

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